Time to toss ISDS in the trash bin of history

The majority of the lawsuits are over our environmental regulations.

Time to toss ISDS in the trash bin of history

Every day I have a moment of gratitude for living in Canada, especially here in the Cowichan Valley. I feel quite protective of this beautiful country I call home and feel rather relieved that there is a conscious awakening of its citizens to stand up in honour of its people and land.

It has come to my attention, via Leadnow that there is a sort of media “blackout” ignoring the importance of covering a very important current story in Canada.

Worldwide, all people should be informed and aware that this week in Toronto, oil and gas company Lone Pine Resources is using Chapter 11 of NAFTA to sue our government for over $100 million, over a temporary fracking ban under the St Lawrence River.

What is Chapter 11 you ask? It is referred to as the Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) that gives billionaire corporations special rights to sue governments for passing laws or policies that could bring down their expected profits.

So where is the news about this you ask? My thoughts exactly! It is rather shocking and even suspicious that a tribunal of this kind is not getting daily coverage as it happens as well as beforehand in its anticipation.

What also horrifies me is that Canada is considered to be the most sued country in the global north due to NAFTA’s Chapter 11 ISDS rules! What’s more is the majority of the lawsuits are over our environmental regulations.

So let’s please be transparent about this and take every opportunity to tell the truth and educate again and again about fracking and the NAFTA renegotiations. These renegotiations offer a chance to highlight the dangers of ISDS and remove the outrageous rules that let corporations undermine our democracy via appalling, greedy lawsuits that must stop.

It’s time to toss ISDS in the trash bin of history.

Christina Hamill

Duncan

Just Posted

#MeToo at work: B.C. women share horrifyingly common sexual assaults

It happens to more people than you might think and impacts women inside and outside of the workplace

Column: How to learn gratitude before it’s too late

In 2009 an Australian nurse named Bronnie Ware wrote an article on “Regrets of the Dying”

Column Drivesmart: Consider safety when the fog rolls in

Speed limits the time available to process data.

Police looking for witnesses to Dec. 8 crash near Crofton

No injuries, but extensive damage reported

VIDEO: Average Canadian food bill to rise by $348 in 2018

Atlantic Canada and B.C. will see the most increases for consumers

Home services, rental rates top concerns: B.C. seniors’ watchdog

Isobel Mackenzie’s annual report says B.C. has 32,000 more seniors than last year

‘Game-changing’ B.C.-born technology tests brain vital signs

B.C. neuroscientist describes the tech as ‘the world’s first objective physiological yard stick for brain function’

5-year anniversary of Sandy Hook shooting

When just saying ‘I’m from Newtown’ can be a cross to bear

Disney buying part of 21st Century Fox in $52.4B deal

Disney is buying a large part of the Murdoch family’s 21st Century Fox for about $52.4 billion

Bountiful polygamist believed he couldn’t be prosecuted: lawyer

Winston Blackmore’s lawyer says Blackmore did not believe he could be prosecuted

Woman charged after altercation injured baby in Toronto

Charges have been laid after a four-month-old baby girl was critically injured in Toronto

Anderson extends invitation to Liberal voters

Interim B.C. Conservative party leader invites “disenfranchised Liberal voters” to join his party

Ottawa Senators forward Chris Neil announces retirement

Veteran Ottawa Senators forward Chris Neil spent 15 seasons with the NHL team

Most Read