Save the last of B.C.’s endangered forests

The last of these highly endangered, globally rare ecosystems are being logged to the brink

Save the last of B.C.’s endangered forests

According to the respected Sierra Club, very few old-growth forests with huge, old trees are still standing across the province — and most of them are slated to be logged. While you read this, the daily area of 500 soccer fields of old growth forest is being clearcut in B.C.

These forests support our health and wellbeing, are critical for endangered species and salmon habitat, provide essential carbon storage, support jobs in tourism, and help defend our communities from flooding and other worsening impacts of climate change.

The last of these highly endangered, globally rare ecosystems are being logged to the brink and unless concerned citizens write to our government about it, the last giant trees will vanish. These big, old trees are vital to our resilience in the face of climate change, and it puts our health and wellbeing at risk.

If readers feel it is important, please write and request the support of our members of the legislature, starting with John.Horgan.MLA@leg.bc.ca and sonia.furstenau.mla@leg.bc.ca

Request their support by:

• Declaring a moratorium on logging these endangered ecosystems with big, old trees and remaining intact old-growth areas

• Funding and supporting Indigenous-led protected areas and land use visions. Help realize the precedent-setting First Nations conservation initiatives underway in the globally significant rainforest regions Clayoquot Sound and Great Bear Rainforest

• Investing in a transition to sustainable second-growth forestry that focuses on value over volume, creating more jobs while protecting biodiversity, drinking water, a liveable climate and community safety

• Ensuring any post-pandemic economic stimulus puts people and ecosystem health first, by investing in Indigenous and community-led forestry and forest conservation initiatives rather than subsidizing large companies

Old-growth forests are non-renewable, given the impacts of climate change. Our health and wellbeing depend on you taking action without further delay.

I am calling on all who care about the future of our planet and our families to act now before it is too late to save the last of B.C.’s endangered forests.

Paula Foot

Duncan

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