Ruminations on war

Ruminations on war

Have we rescued a beleaguered ‘peace’ from the fury of madness that we have?

Ruminations on war

As I listened to, “And the band played waltzing Matilda”, I cried profusely, being familiar with the story.

Where were the major generals who concocted this debacle? Not with the troops at the front, you can bet!

This story gives me the creeps knowing the slaughter that awaited these young virile troops, who were chomping at the bit to prove their worth for King and country… Into the jaws of death as lambs to the slaughter, should be their memorial.

Yet, as we observe today’s Man’s inhumanity to himself, I wonder if these previous lessons were for naught or just an opportunity to prove that the ammunition was ready for the slaughter to come, yet another interesting possibility, being useful in defending ourselves case of a future need.

We are most certainly a rum lot, with our ceremonies that recall past fiascos and blunders; we even receive medals for our heroism, or being involved, all in the name of patriotism, which in our case it was for King and country, Amen!

The value of man does not come into the equation; it is the deed that counts. Who supplies ordinance, plus its transportation, who is it who among us cares a whit? Pays cash, or who else is in on the deal of willing suppliers? The material to carry out such heinous deeds on one’s neighbour? It has become a profitable business. Yes, people breed like rabbits, so where is the beef? We have been fighting for one thing: supremacy, or another ever since our forebears arrived on this planet, so why quit now? It’s our heritage, don’t you know?

It is rather strange that the peaceful side of our nature has been so corrupted as to almost disappear. Often I wonder about war, its purpose, its value to the society, that it left behind after pseudo platitudes on how well we fought the war also how nice we must feel having vanquished the foe, then preparing for the next show!

Have we rescued a beleaguered ‘peace’ from the fury of madness that we have? Concocted over our pot as an alchemist would do, refining the process each time a thought for improvement of execution enter our mind!

Know that now we have improved our means of annoying the foe with new gadgets, they now wonder how to retaliate against these new devices. Such is the cat and mouse game; all in fun you say? Ah, war was never so thrilling as the now.

G. Manners

Cowichan Bay

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