Have anybody’s taxes actually gone down?

Have anybody’s taxes actually gone down?

I’m pretty sure I have my figures fairly accurate for my arguments on the CVRD municipal tax notices. I live in area D of the CVRD and the taxes per $100,000 on residential properties went from 297.74 in 2017 to 284.36 in 2018-a decrease of about 5%. Accordingly the budget went up about 5.35% for the CVRD in general.

Now when the tax assessments come in at the beginning of the year they like to make it clear that “a change in your assessed value does not necessarily mean a change in your taxes.” This would certainly keep the amount of appeals down to a minimum as people would still not have any idea how it will affect their actual taxes. My assessed value was 7% above the norm for my neighborhood. I just have to take their word on that unless I decide to go into extensive research i.e house sales in neighborhood etc.

I was also informed that my assessment was based on home and lot improvements. I suppose pulling weeds and trimming trees and cutting grass is included in this improvement as I had no other improvements i.e. painting house or additions. I have not been able to get a satisfactory answer from the CVRD or BC assessments as to why my taxes went up $400.00-an increase of 15%. We are continually told that they just take what they need budget wise. It is also made clear that residence that are at the norm or below will either have their taxes remain the same or go down.

I would like to know who’s taxes have actually gone down. A friend in Lake Cowichan actually had his taxes increase by about 40%. I have no idea about the budget demands for that area but it certainly would not coincide with that kind of increase. Are these increases arbitrary as it seems there is no correlation between budget needs and tax increases. Somebody please explain this to me as the CVRD is having trouble satisfying me with a proper explanation that makes sense.

Evan Begbie

Cowichan Bay

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