TimberWest will begin paving a section of a logging road near Youbou on Sept, 25 in an effort to deal with dust and mud issues. (File photo)

TimberWest to pave section of road near Youbou

Forest company looks to deal with dust and mud issues

TimberWest has announced it will begin paving a section of a private forest road near Youbou on Sept. 25 in an effort to help deal with dust and mud issues.

The road will be paved to Cottonwood Creek and road closures will be in effect from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., staring Monday.

The forest company is asking motorists to use the South Shore Road for access beyond Youbou.

Company spokeswoman Pam Jorgenson said that, in addition, TimberWest will focus on its continued collaboration with the Cowichan Valley Regional District and the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure to minimize dust, mud and noise from industrial traffic in the area.

She said that includes coordinating effective street sweeping, making additional improvements to the truck wash, and implementing solutions to slow down traffic.

“We will keep the community informed on our collective progress to implement these solutions on a regular basis by sharing information through the Youbou Community Association newsletter and Facebook page,” Jorgenson said.

“As is TimberWest’s practice, we will continue to share our harvesting plans with the community in advance of harvesting activities.”

TimberWest took the option of constructing a new bypass route around Youbou Road for logging trucks in an effort to deal with the issues off the table after a public meeting in the community in late August.

FOR RELATED STORY, CLICK HERE

Many residents raised concerns around landslides, erosion and severe water run-off into Youbou from a new bypass route above the community if the construction of such a route went ahead.

Some at the meeting felt that the real purpose of TimberWest was to build the bypass road mainly so the company could log the hills above Youbou.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Chemainus artist’s painting of a front-line worker a powerful image

Chemainus artist puts her creative touch to COVID Angel

Drivesmart column: Traffic calming in your neighbourhood

Since the police are only part of the solution, what are the alternatives?

COVID-19 means different graduations for Cowichan students in 2020

At Lake Cowichan students did the traditional hat toss

Mary Lowther column: Pre-sprouting corn in paper towels

My new packet of spinach didn’t grow when I put the seeds directly into potting soil

B.C. accommodators need phone lines to light up as in-province travel given green light

Travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the tourism and hospitality industries

List of cancelled Cowichan Valley community events

An ongoing list of events that have been cancelled in the Cowichan Valley due to COVID-19

300 Cache Creek residents on evacuation alert due to flood risk as river rises

Heavy rainfall on Canada Day has river rising steadily, threatening 175 properties

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Annual music event in Comox Valley celebrates online instead

Vancouver Island MusicFest holds virtual celebration set for July 10

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

Most Read