Pop, candy and now opioids in vending machines?

Pop, candy and now opioids in vending machines?

B.C. health official wants to put safe and common opioid in vending machines

Making a safe opioid available in vending machines may be the next harm reduction tool to fight the deadly overdose epidemic, says the executive medical director of the B.C. Centre for Disease Control.

Dr. Mark Tyndall said he envisions a regulated system where drug users would be assessed, registered and issued a card to use in vending machines to obtain hydromorphone, a painkiller commonly marketed under the brand name Dilaudid.

“I’m hoping that it’s kind of like supervised injection sites,” he said of the program that could begin as early as next March. “At first it sounded a bit off the wall and now it’s pretty well accepted.”

Funding to expand access to hydromorphone would first be used to distribute pills through supportive housing units that also dispense methadone and suboxone as well as through a nurse at supervised injection sites before they are sold through vending machines, Tyndall said.

“People could pick these drugs up at supervised injection sites but there’s no reason you couldn’t use vending machine technology to do that. So people would show up, have their card, click it in and get a couple of pills.”

Hydromorphone pills dissolve well in water and Tyndall said he expects most people will grind them up and inject them.

A small part of the funding will come from a three year, $1 million Health Canada grant that includes patients in Alberta, Tyndall said, adding the machines could also be placed in other areas where drug use is prevalent, as well as near health clinics in remote communities.

“We don’t have really anything to offer people who are dying around the province in smaller communities, where sometimes they don’t even have a doctor who can prescribe methadone and certainly will never have a supervised injection site,” Tyndall said.

“You’d have to ensure there’s some security system because we don’t want people kicking these things in and stealing all the pills, and we don’t want situations where people are taking out big quantities and selling them on the street.”

Tyndall said while theft is a major concern of any opioid distribution system, anyone buying stolen hydromorphone pills would at least be getting safe drugs instead of those that could be laced with the powerful opioid fentanyl, which has been linked to hundreds of deaths across Canada.

Safeguards would also include supplying two or three pills, up to three times a day, to prevent users from being targeted by criminals, Tyndall said.

“We’ve done some focus groups and most people feel they’d be quite happy with two Dilaudids, eight milligrams, three times a day,” he said.

However, people who are assessed as doing well could eventually obtain a two- or three-day supply of pills, much like take-home methadone, Tyndall added.

High-dose injectable hydromorphone is currently provided to chronic substance users at a Vancouver clinic called Crosstown, the only such facility that also dispenses diacetylmorphine, or medical-grade heroin to patients who have repeatedly failed to kick an addiction to illicit drugs after multiple drug substitution programs.

“This is not an addiction medicine response,” Tyndall said, adding new approaches need to have an impact on the overdose epidemic. “We need to make this is pubic health thing, much like vaccine programs.”

The B.C. Coroners Service has reported that 1,208 people fatally overdosed in British Columbia between January and October this year. It said fentanyl was detected in 999 of the confirmed and suspected deaths so far in 2017, an increase of 136 per cent from the same period last year.

Ontario’s Health Ministry said the province has about half a dozen remote locations where prescription drugs are available through dispensing machines. Patients consult in real time with an off-site pharmacist using two-way video monitor in the machine.

Allan Malek, chief pharmacy officer of the Ontario Pharmacists Association, said Tyndall has floated an innovative idea during a national overdose crisis but it would have to be adequately monitored.

“In terms of what’s happening in B.C. and other parts of the country, these are discussions that have to be had. People are dying. Something has to be done.”

Camille Bains, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A police car at the scene of a child’s death Friday, April 9, at the Falcon Nest Motel in Duncan. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
RCMP investigating child’s death at Duncan’s Falcon Nest Motel

First responders attended to a call about an unresponsive child at the… Continue reading

Brent Clancy, president of the Cowichan Lake District Chamber of Commerce, takes down the signs at the Lake Cowichan Visitor Centre, which closed its doors for good on Jan. 31. Mayor Bob Day says the possible creation of a Town tourism committee is not a response to the closure. (Robert Barron/Citizen)
Town of Lake Cowichan looking to form tourism and housing committees

Decision not related to the Lake Cowichan Visitor Information Centre closure

“Representing the school district, legion, and Kaatza Station Museum left to right are Georgie Clark of the museum, Wilma Rowbottom of School District #66 and Ernie Spencer, representing the Legion. The museum and Legion, along with the Village will each take a piece of the old wood shop.” (The Lake News)
Lake Flashback: Soapboxes, woodshop split, taxes down

Remember these stories from Lake Cowichan?

Tim Schewe
Drivesmart column: Rules around bicycle lanes

The lane is often painted green to distinguish it from lanes intended for motor vehicles.

Robert’s column
Robert Barron column: New hospital shouldn’t charge for parking

Paying a parking meter is the last thing people visiting a hospital should have to worry about.

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and Premier John Horgan describe vaccine rollout at the legislature, March 29, 2021. (B.C. government)
1,262 more COVID-19 infections in B.C. Friday, 9,574 active cases

Province’s mass vaccination reaches one million people

People walk past the Olympic rings in Whistler, B.C., Friday, May 15, 2020. Whistler which is a travel destination for tourists around the world is seeing the effects of travel bans due to COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Adults living, working in Whistler, B.C., eligible for COVID-19 vaccine on Monday

The move comes as the province deals with a rush of COVID-19 and variant cases in the community

RCMP display some of the fish seized from three suspects who pleaded guilty to violating the Fisheries Act in 2019, in this undated handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - RCMP
3 banned from fishing, holding licences after overfishing violations near Vancouver Island

Mounties seized the group’s 30-foot fishing vessel and all equipment on board at the time

B.C. Premier John Horgan responds to questions during a postelection news conference in Vancouver, on Sunday, October 25, 2020. British Columbia’s opposition Liberals and Greens acknowledge the COVID-19 pandemic has presented huge challenges for Horgan’s government, but they say Monday’s throne speech must outline a coherent plan for the province’s economic, health, social and environmental future. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Horgan’s NDP to bring in throne speech in B.C., Opposition wants coherent plan

Farnworth said the budget will include details of government investment in communities and infrastructure

FILE - An arena worker removes the net from the ice after the Vancouver Canucks and Calgary Flames NHL hockey game was postponed due to a positive COVID-19 test result, in Vancouver, British Columbia, in this Wednesday, March 31, 2021, file photo. As vaccinations ramp up past a pace of 3 million a day in the U.S, the NHL is in a tougher spot than the other three major North American professional sports leagues because seven of 31 teams are based on Canada. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)
Vancouver Canucks scheduled to practice Sunday, resume games April 16 after COVID outbreak

Canucks outbreak delayed the team’s season by eight games

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod, seen here on April 9, 2021 with four-year-old sister Elena and mom Vanessa, was born with limb differences. The family, including husband/dad Sean McLeod, is looking for a family puppy that also has a limb difference. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
B.C. family looking for puppy with limb difference, just like 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy McLeod born as bilateral amputee, now her family wants to find ‘companion’ puppy for her

A vehicle that was driven through the wall of a parkade at Uptown Shopping Centre and into the nearby Walmart on April 9 was removed through another hole in the wall later that night. (Photo via Saanich Police Department and Ayush Kakkar)
Vehicle launched into B.C. Walmart removed following rescue of trapped workers

Crews cut new hole in parkade wall to remove vehicle safely

Most Read