Agricultural Land Commission chair and CEO Richard Bullock (left) has been fired as Agriculture Minister Norm Letnick implements the BC Liberals' overhaul of farmland regulation.

B.C. axes Agricultural Land Reserve boss

Richard Bullock refused to appoint regional panel members, replaced by former Saanich mayor Frank Leonard

The B.C. government has “released” Agricultural Land Commission board chair and CEO Richard Bullock, and will pay out his five-year contract until it ends in November, Agriculture Minister Norm Letnick said Thursday.

Bullock will be replaced effective immediately by long-time Saanich mayor Frank Leonard, who was voted out after nearly 20 years in last fall’s civic elections.

Letnick said with new regulations taking effect to manage the Agricultural Land Reserve with two zones, it was time to make a change and let Leonard and the board choose a new CEO.

The B.C. government has been at odds with Bullock since early in his five-year term, when he stopped appointing commissioners to six regional panels around the province.

Energy Minister Bill Bennett, who pushed through the two-zone system under the auspices of his “core review” of government services, said a year ago that Bullock found the regional panels to be “a pain in the ass” and preferred to run the commission from its head office in Burnaby. So the government mandated regional appointments in legislation along with the two-zone concept.

Leonard takes over as the ALC deals with a vast Interior “zone two” with relaxed rules for second residences and non-farm activities. Commissioners are also expected to deal with applications by a British manufacturing giant buying B.C. Interior farms to turn back to forest for European Union carbon credits.

Letnick said the regional panels are up and running, and he doesn’t expect the change at the top to cause delays in making decisions on farmland use or exclusion.

 

Just Posted

After round-robin success, Mustangs silenced in semis

Cowichan’s success includes win over previously unbeaten Kelowna

LEXI BAINAS COLUMN: Who’d turn down a chance to perform in Duncan? It was a mystery

Cowichan Symphony Society’s Ted Rhodes shares a fun story about the Royal Wedding

Cowichan Tribes, Lila Community Choir join hands for fundraising concert

With guests including the Blue Eagle Drum Group, this concert looks like a special day indeed

Siebring jumps off the fence to ‘yes’ side of amalgamation

“Common sense tells me that it’s time to undo a mistake that was made in 1912”

CVAC Jaguars beat the heat at Victoria’s Dogwood meet

Jaguars combine for 80 podium finishes

Black Press Media to launch Pipeline Full of Controversy series

Series covers Trans Mountain’s history, science, Indigenous reaction, politics and economics

B.C. RCMP swoop in to save injured eagle

An eagle with a broken wing now in a recovery facility after RCMP rescue near Bella Coola

Catalyst Paper to sell U.S. mills to Chinese company

Sale will allow company to focus on B.C. interests, says president Ned Dwyer

Bug spray 101: Health Canada wants you to stay bite free

Health Canada is reminding Canadians to use bug spray and other insect repellents safely

Unions reject CP Rail contract offers

Both meeting Friday to determine next steps; 72 hours notice required before strike action.

B.C. jewellers warn public about fake gold scam

‘They are playing on people’s sympathy and their greed’

Former B.C. premier says pot industry about to enter Wild West

Mike Harcourt says Canada is about to enter a new gold rush with many dreaming of striking it rich

Hunt continues for two suspects in Ontario restaurant explosion

The explosion left 15 people injured, but all victims have now been released from hospital

Most Read