August 4, 2019 will mark the fifth anniversary of the Mount Polley Mine breach. A delegation lead by Amnesty International will travel to Mitchell Bay on Quesnel Lake on the weekend to deliver hundreds of messages of solidarity from all over Canada to people affected by the 2014 mining disaster.

Anger, betrayal still felt five years after Mount Polley Mine breach in northern B.C.

“We just don’t want to drink the water knowing Mount Polley’s still dumping their crap in there.”

Angry, disappointed, betrayed — those are some of the words Quesnel Lake resident Doug Watt uses to described how he still feels as the five-year anniversary of the Mount Polley Mine breach approaches this weekend.

Watt lives on the lake near Cedar Point Park downstream of the Aug. 4, 2014 dam breach disaster, which released upwards of 25 million cubic metres of mine waste and water into Quesnel Lake and Quesnel River.

Watt said he was asleep that fateful morning when firefighters called and alerted him to the unfolding emergency. The campgrounds nearby were full with campers for the long weekend, and everyone was rushing to pack up and leave because of possible flooding or a log jam at the Likely bridge.

In the years since, the communities and businesses on the lake have tried to recover from the breach, which is considered one of the biggest mining disasters in Canadian history. Mount Polley Mine eventually received approval to go back to work. It also completed several years of remediation work to Hazeltine Creek and the surrounding area.

READ MORE: Mount Polley continues remediation and monitoring as fifth year after the breach unfolds

Last year, the union representing some of the workers took the company to court for not giving enough advanced notice of job layoffs, at which point the mine revealed they were under pressure because of mounting financial losses. In April 2019, the mine closed indefinitely.

Watt said the experience was and continues to be a difficult one, and disappointing.

“Generally it’s been very stressful,” he said, noting he doesn’t trust the company or government when it comes to protecting the lake.

Specifically, Watt is furious that after the breach, the mine was granted a permit to pipe wastewater into the lake in front of Hazeltine Creek in April 2017.

“You look at what this lake was before — it was pristine. They are continuing to insult us by adding their effluent.”

READ MORE: Mount Polley Mine’s sampling of Quesnel Lake questioned by local resident

Watt said the company is supposed to stop discharging from the pipeline Dec. 31, 2022 once they come up with a water plan, but he said he’s seen plans that show the pipeline still discharging into the lake in 2025.

“We believe their whole plan is to never take that (pipeline) out of the lake.”

In the months and years since the breach, he said residents have seen the once-crystal clear lake waters turn cloudy periodically as it continues to flush the slurry, as well as algae blooms, and that guides say the insect hatches are not the same as they used to be on Quesnel River.

The government has deemed the lake water safe to drink, but Watt said he and his family no longer drink from it.

“We just don’t want to drink the water knowing Mount Polley’s still dumping their crap in there.”

Watt is a member of the public liaison committee that meets throughout the year with Mount Polley Mine officials who are required to provide updates and answer questions.

He is also a member of the Concerned Citizens of Quesnel Lake, founded by Christine McLean, who are fighting to stop the pipeline through B.C.’s Environmental Appeal Board.

To date, the mine and its parent company, Imperial Metals, have not been charged or fined in the 2014 breach, although Watt confirmed officers were in the area a few months ago asking questions relating to an investigation.

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada declined to confirm with the Tribune whether charges have been forwarded.

On Saturday, Amnesty International Canada will be arriving at Mitchell Bay near Hazeltine Creek on Quesnel Lake from Vancouver Island to share solidarity messages, record interviews and be a part of an anniversary gathering hosted by McLean.

READ MORE: B.C.’s Mount Polley Mine to suspend operations

McLean will also be giving a presentation and report on the work her group has been doing, with an update on their appeal.

Meanwhile, disciplinary hearings are being scheduled for engineers Todd Martin, Stephen Rice and Laura Fidel in relation to the breach under the regulating authority, Engineers and Geoscientists BC.

Martin’s hearing is scheduled for May 4-8 and May 11-15, 2020. Dates for Rice and Fidel are to be determined.


Do you have a comment about this story? email:
editor@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

 

Doug Watt still lives on Quesnel Lake. (photo submitted)

Just Posted

North Cowichan taxpayers could face a one-time 133% increase in ‘worst case’ VIMC lawsuit

An average home could see a tax increase of $2,164 in one year

LAKE FLASHBACK: Remember swine flu? Bosnian conflict? Moving St. Christopher’s? It’s been a while

From worldwide stories to those close to home, we’ve a real cross-section this week

Mary Lowther column: Making your own supplements from garden plants

Health food stores offer powdered green supplements to augment deficiencies of commercial vegetables

Lake Cowichan fire department back with annual toy and food drive on Dec. 13-14

As Lake area gets ready to fill Christmas hampers, firefighters call for donations of toys and food

Chargers in every match at provincial tourney

DCS finishes 12th after competitive tournament

VIDEO: Federal Liberals’ throne speech welcomes opposition’s ideas

Trudeau will need NDP or Bloc support to pass legislation and survive confidence votes

VIDEO: John Lennon’s iconic Rolls Royce rolls into Vancouver Island college for checkup

Royal BC Museum, Camosun College and Carriageworks Restorations come together to care for car

VIDEO: Rockslide closes part of Highway 93 in Fairmont Hot Springs

Geotechnical team called in to do an assessment after rocks fell from hoodoos

Petition calls for appeal of ex-Burns Lake mayor’s sentence for sex assault

Prosecution service says Luke Strimbold’s case is under review

Northwest B.C. wildlife shelter rescues particularly tiny bear cub

Shelter co-founder says the cub weighs less than a third of what it should at this time of year

BC firefighters to help battle Australian bushfires

Canada sent 22 people, including 7 from B.C.

B.C. NDP touts the end of MSP premiums

Horgan, James held news conference to reiterate that people will get their last bill this month

Oscar Hickes: Longest running hockey tournament on Vancouver Island cancelled

Patrick Murray, one of the organizers for the tournament, broke the sad news on social media.

Illicit drug deaths down, but B.C. coroner says thousands still overdose

Chief coroner Life Lapointe says province’s drug supply remains unpredictable

Most Read