DakhaBrakha are back in Duncan on Oct. 20. (Submitted)

VIDEO: Unique Ukrainian group DakhaBrakha is back in the Cowichan Valley

Combining sounds from around the world with the folklore of a Ukrainian village, this group scores

World music quartet DakhaBrakha returns to Duncan Sunday, Oct. 20, at 7:30 p.m. at the Cowichan Performing Arts Centre.

Last year’s concert featuring this Ukrainian group and its unexpected combination of musical styles was a revelation to the audience, starting with the group’s appearance.

Yes, those towering black lamb’s wool hats and vivid folkloric costumes are back.

Folk, world, punk rap: it all blends into a unique sound. The genesis though, is the same. The group’s music is based on songs collected in Ukrainian villages then fused with global inspiration.

According to their concert publicity DakhaBrakha says, “The role of Ukrainian ancient song is decisive for us. It is the main source of inspiration and the foundation of creative experimentation. We are curious to put an authentic song in an unusual situation. Then the song plays with brand new colours.”

DakhaBrakha describes their sound as “ethno-chaos.”

It is a tapestry of indie folk-rock, urban hip-hop and pop music with one foot in village Ukrainian culture.

Audiences may hear cello and drums one moment, then be transported to a menagerie of various bird and animal sounds. It’s a refreshing reinterpretation of Eastern European folk music.

Acknowledging that each concert is similar, but each venue is not, Dakha Brakha adjusts each program to a specific concert hall and audience.

Formed in 2004, DakhaBrakha’s renown expanded exponentially when Rolling Stone magazine heralded them as the “Best Breakout” performers at 2014’s Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Manchester, Tennessee, one of the most influential festivals in North America. Bonnaroo is Creole slang meaning “really good time”.

DakhaBrakha has played concerts and performances and taken part in numerous festivals all across Europe and made their mark in China, Australia, the U.S., Canada, Colombia, New Zealand, and Brazil.

Their name and their sound is original, outstanding and authentic at the same time. DakhaBrakha means “give/take” in old Ukrainian.

You will find them at the crossroads of folklore and theatre, and they love the giving and taking that occurs during a lively performance with a great audience.

Tickets are $36 each for adults and are available in person at the Cowichan Ticket Centre, by phone 250-746-2722 or online at cowichanpac.ca

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