Prizes support urban aboriginal life

Community-based projects in Penticton, Victoria and Vancouver receive $15,000 each to continue work

Aboriginal Relations Minister John Rustad listens as Bruce Parisian of Victoria Native Friendship Centre explains program of art works commissioned from a local people Monday.

Projects in Penticton, Victoria and Vancouver to improve circumstances for B.C. aboriginal people who live off reserve have been awarded prizes of $15,000 each to continue their work.

B.C. Aboriginal Relations Minister John Rustad announced winners Monday of a province-wide competition for community-based projects that was launched in February. There were 21 entries, and winners are:

• Penticton Peach Festival aboriginal cultural village, presenting traditional food and ceremonies to increase community collaboration and reduce racism.

• Arts For Wealth, a program of the Victoria Native Friendship Centre that pays honorariums to aboriginal artists to produce original works for auction at cultural and charitable events.

• Vancouver Native Health Society’s aboriginal instant kitchen, a cooking program that passes on traditional food gathering and preparation along with nutrition theory, food label education and hands-on cooking, shopping and gardening skills.

Rustad noted that 74 per cent of B.C.’s aboriginal people live off reserves, and 60 per cent of those live in urban areas. The contest was created in conjunction with the B.C. Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres.

“This competition was really about finding out the groovy things that are happening in the communities around British Columbia, and honouring that and recognizing that that’s where the solutions are,” said Paul Lacerte, the association’s executive director.

 

Just Posted

Officials move in on homeless camp on Lewis Street

Occupants left with no place to live

#MeToo at work: B.C. women share horrifyingly common sexual assaults

It happens to more people than you might think and impacts women inside and outside of the workplace

Column: How to learn gratitude before it’s too late

In 2009 an Australian nurse named Bronnie Ware wrote an article on “Regrets of the Dying”

Column Drivesmart: Consider safety when the fog rolls in

Speed limits the time available to process data.

VIDEO: All aboard the Christmas train at the BC Forest Discovery Centre

The Christmas Train at the BC Forest Discovery Centre in Duncan is… Continue reading

Cowichan Coffee Time: Donations and fundraising success

• Treasurer Cyndy Dinter of the Auxiliary to Cowichan District Hospital recently… Continue reading

Debt-to-household-income ratio rises in third quarter

Total household credit market debt grew to $2.11 trillion in the third quarter

B.C. Mountie told to resign after texting teenage sex assault victim

RCMP documents say Const. Brian Eden sent sexually inappropriate photos to 17-year-old girl

Family doctors should learn to treat addiction, not shun patients: scientist

B.C. Centre on Substance Use’s Dr. Evan Wood said efforts underway to change addiction medicine image

Four dog deaths investigated in Cranbrook

One vet suggests a parallel to these deaths and similar ones in 2016

Meningococcal disease outbreak declared in Okanagan

Five cases in last six months among 15- to 19-year-olds, including one in Vernon

VIDEO: Miniature Christmas village makes trip to Youbou worthwhile

It’s a trip through a winter wonderland, all set up in a room at Cassy’s Coffee House in Youbou.

Province rejects Ajax mine in Kamloops

KGHM Ajax had proposed a 1,700-hectare open-pit copper and gold mine, just southwest of Kamloops

Most Read