Explore one of BC’s best-known regions along the Sea-to-Sky Highway.

Explore one of BC’s best-known regions along the Sea-to-Sky Highway.

3 New Ways to Explore Vancouver and the Sea-to-Sky

See familiar places with fresh eyes

Rediscover one of BC’s best-known corridors when you explore Metro Vancouver and the Sea-to-Sky. See familiar places with fresh eyes: book a foraging tour in Vancouver, hike to hidden lakes in Squamish, or take an Indigenous cultural tour in Whistler, for example.

Head on a Culinary Journey

Expand your repertoire of restaurants on a foodie quest. Richmond’s Dumpling Trail is a must-do for fans of juicy dumplings, wontons, and bao. Revisit your favourite Italian eateries on Commercial Drive, or cross the bridge to the North Shore’s Shipyards District and hop between up-and-coming breweries.

Plan a getaway in the Sea-to-Sky Corridor. Stop in Squamish for craft cider and casual al fresco dining. Whistler – celebrated for its lively après scene – is also a foodie haven. You can do it all: sip BC wines and slurp local oysters; tuck into decadent goodies at an artisan bakery; or sip hand-crafted cocktails. Take a food tasting tour for the full experience.

Pemberton’s farms-with-a-view offer a chance to get closer to your food than ever before. Pick fresh berries (don’t forget to snag the homemade pies and preserves), and stop by a local eatery for ingredient-driven fare.

Celebrate Art and Culture

Indigenous people have lived on this land since time immemorial and their influences are deeply woven into the cultural fabric, from sea to sky. Learn about the living culture through an Indigenous-led walking tour through Stanley Park.

There are many ways to discover (or rediscover) the rich culture and thriving art scene. Cycle through historic neighbourhoods like Gastown, hunt for colourful urban art in Mount Pleasant, and find secret coffee shops along South Granville. Or, visit one of many museums, galleries, and gardens for a moment of quiet reflection.

Find new ways to experience Metro Vancouver and the Sea-to-Sky. Blake Jorgenson photo.

Find new ways to experience Metro Vancouver and the Sea-to-Sky. Blake Jorgenson photo.

Gear Up for Adventure

Though Vancouver’s glittering skyscrapers inspired the nickname “City of Glass,” nature is still just around the bend. For every delicious meal savoured, there’s a bike trail to explore. For every art gallery visited, there’s a mountain to summit.

You’ve probably driven the winding Sea-to-Sky Highway to visit communities between West Vancouver and Pemberton before, but there are always new ways to experience old favourites. View the Sea-to-Sky’s volcanic peaks with a flightseeing tour, take a gondola to great heights in Squamish or Whistler, raft through voracious glacier-fed rivers, or trot through Pemberton meadows by horseback.

Squamish – typically known for mountain activities like rock climbing, hiking, and biking – is also a steppingstone to Howe Sound. Book a guided paddleboard tour or kiteboarding lesson to spend time in the fjord. Meanwhile, adventure-filled Whistler needs no introduction. BC residents and visitors alike enjoy alpine sightseeing, lift-accessed downhill riding, and lake exploration, among other activities.

Start planning your summer travel today at ExploreBC.com.

British ColumbiaDBC Vancouver Sea SkyDiningHikingImpressive West CoastIndigenous tourismThings to dotravel

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