Water

Sockeye salmon struggle to get upstream in historically low water levels in Weaver Creek near the Harrison River north of Chilliwack on Oct. 20, 2022. (Submitted by a Watershed Watch Salmon Society volunteer)

OPINION w/VIDEO: Salmon die and people lose their water as B.C. sleepwalks into yet another crisis

‘It’s time those responsible for protecting B.C.s environment spent a little more time out here with us’

  • Oct 25, 2022

 

Cowichan moves to Stage 4 water restrictions. (Citizen file photo)

Cowichan moves to most extreme water restrictions ever

But rain is forecast in the coming days

 

A view of Gibsons Landing from the top of Soames Hill, a short but steep hike on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast, is seen near the town of Grantham’s Landing, B.C., on May 23, 2016. Some businesses and amenities on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast must stop using all treated drinking water within hours as severe drought in the region forces declaration of a state of local emergency, but officials say there’s no need to panic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lauren Krugel

First COVID, now drought, B.C. brewery takes water-use restrictions in stride

Water system that supplies Sechelt area is at ‘imminent risk’ of running dry

 

A man walks in the water off Locarno Beach during a stretch of unseasonably warm weather, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, Oct. 6, 2022. Water use in Metro Vancouver is much higher, while reservoir levels are lower than normal, prompting the regional district to ask millions of residents and businesses to conserve.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Drought prompts request for Metro Vancouver residents to take shorter showers

Region’s water use up by 20 per cent for time of year because of the extended dry weather

A man walks in the water off Locarno Beach during a stretch of unseasonably warm weather, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, Oct. 6, 2022. Water use in Metro Vancouver is much higher, while reservoir levels are lower than normal, prompting the regional district to ask millions of residents and businesses to conserve.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Cowichan region now under Stage 3 water restrictions. (Citizen file photo)

Cowichan region moves to Stage 3 water restrictions

Eastern Vancouver Island now at Drought Level 4

Cowichan region now under Stage 3 water restrictions. (Citizen file photo)
Water restrictions in North Cowichan now at Stage 3. (Citizen file photo)

North Cowichan moves to Stage 3 water restrictions

Drought rating now at Level 4 on eastern Vancouver Island

  • Sep 23, 2022
Water restrictions in North Cowichan now at Stage 3. (Citizen file photo)
North Cowichan adds additional stage of water restrictions during droughts. (Citizen file photo)

North Cowichan adds additional stage of water restrictions during droughts

Move intended to align with other water providers in region

  • Sep 22, 2022
North Cowichan adds additional stage of water restrictions during droughts. (Citizen file photo)
With water levels at extremely high levels in Cowichan Lake, Catalyst Crofton has increased water flow rates at its weir on the Cowichan River. (Gazette file photo)

Water levels in Cowichan Lake exceptionally high

Catalyst Crofton has increased flow rates at the weir

With water levels at extremely high levels in Cowichan Lake, Catalyst Crofton has increased water flow rates at its weir on the Cowichan River. (Gazette file photo)
Several CVRD directors are questioning which levels of government are responsible for what in the region’s watersheds. (Citizen file photo)
Several CVRD directors are questioning which levels of government are responsible for what in the region’s watersheds. (Citizen file photo)
Drowning is “not the violent splashing and shouting for help that one sees on TV. There’s no screaming or flailing of arms,” writes reporter Jenna Hauck. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)

COLUMN: Drowning is silent; familiarize yourself with the signs of it

Chilliwack reporter shares what signs of drowning look like after incident with son in pool

Drowning is “not the violent splashing and shouting for help that one sees on TV. There’s no screaming or flailing of arms,” writes reporter Jenna Hauck. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Watering restrictions for all the watering systems operated by Cowichan Valley Regional District are now in place. (File photo)

CVRD now in Stage 2 watering restrictions

Watering of lawns and gardens limited to two hours a day

  • Aug 25, 2022
Watering restrictions for all the watering systems operated by Cowichan Valley Regional District are now in place. (File photo)
Saanich police and fire boats were kept busy at Elk Lake on June 25 with two rescues involving four children. (File photo courtesy Saanich Police Department)

4 children rescued far from shore during busy day at Saanich’s Elk Lake

Incidents prompt water safety warning from Saanich police

Saanich police and fire boats were kept busy at Elk Lake on June 25 with two rescues involving four children. (File photo courtesy Saanich Police Department)
Lori Iannidinardo, chairwoman of the Cowichan Valley Regional District (left), and Cowichan Tribes Chief Lydia Hwitsum signed a memorandum of understanding on June 3 for the two local governments to work together with Catalyst mill in Crofton to ensure that a long-term water supply for the region is achieved. (Robert Barron/Citizen)

Watershed work celebrated by Cowichan Tribes, partners

Provincial funding helped pay for the work

Lori Iannidinardo, chairwoman of the Cowichan Valley Regional District (left), and Cowichan Tribes Chief Lydia Hwitsum signed a memorandum of understanding on June 3 for the two local governments to work together with Catalyst mill in Crofton to ensure that a long-term water supply for the region is achieved. (Robert Barron/Citizen)
A man’s body was recovered from Long Lake after he was reported missing over the weekend. (Black Press Media file photo)

Man’s body recovered from Nanaimo lake after apparent drowning

Victim went for a swim Sunday, searchers found body Monday

A man’s body was recovered from Long Lake after he was reported missing over the weekend. (Black Press Media file photo)
Catalyst Crofton will resume regular seasonal operations at the Cowichan Lake weir in April. (File photo)

Catalyst Crofton to resume operations at Cowichan Lake weir in April

Weir regulates water flow out of Cowichan Lake

Catalyst Crofton will resume regular seasonal operations at the Cowichan Lake weir in April. (File photo)
Cowichan Tribes, province have reached an agreement to develop a water sustainability plan for the Koksilah watershed. (File photo)
Cowichan Tribes, province have reached an agreement to develop a water sustainability plan for the Koksilah watershed. (File photo)
Work is underway to bring water access back to the Ucluelet First Nation community of Hitacu after a barge broke a primary water line. (District of Ucluelet photo)

More bad news for Ucluelet First Nation as it enters second week without water

Barge-damaged water line from Ucluelet to Hitacu deemed beyond repair

Work is underway to bring water access back to the Ucluelet First Nation community of Hitacu after a barge broke a primary water line. (District of Ucluelet photo)
Sooke Lake Reservoir is on the brink of exceeding its capacity. (Photo courtesy CRD)

Greater Victoria reservoir close to overflow a month earlier than ever before

CRD’s primary water source nears 100 per cent of capacity, spillage would affect Sooke River flows

Sooke Lake Reservoir is on the brink of exceeding its capacity. (Photo courtesy CRD)
Roberta Hicks de Plumpton has a front row seat to the high water on the Chemainus River. Husband Clive’s Great Wall protects the property from the flood waters. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Great Wall of Westholme the ultimate barrier between the Hicks household and Chemainus River

Husband’s legacy ensures rising flood waters are kept at bay

Roberta Hicks de Plumpton has a front row seat to the high water on the Chemainus River. Husband Clive’s Great Wall protects the property from the flood waters. (Photo by Don Bodger)
Members of the Iqaluit Fire Department assist with flushing the city’s water pipes in Iqaluit, Nunavut, on Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021. Engineers say the source of fuel in Iqaluit’s water likely comes from an underground fuel tank built in 1962. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dustin Patar
Members of the Iqaluit Fire Department assist with flushing the city’s water pipes in Iqaluit, Nunavut, on Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021. Engineers say the source of fuel in Iqaluit’s water likely comes from an underground fuel tank built in 1962. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dustin Patar