history

The booklet roots present day activism in the history of racist policies, arguing the history must be acknowledged in order to change. (CCPA)

New resource dives into 150 years of racist policy in B.C.

Racist history must be acknowledged in order to change, authors say

 

Rob Rondeau, PhD candidate at SFU, is embarking on a mission to find definitive evidence of human migration to the continent. (SFU supplied image)

VIDEO: Marine archaeologist looking for clues of ancient migration in B.C. waters

SFU researcher hoping to find 15,000 year-old archaeological sites underwater

 

“That’s a lot of hundreds, but it adds up to only $5,000 which really isn’t much in the world of debt. Rev. Dr. Cullene Bryant, Minister of the Lake Cowichan United Church needs to raise that money which would get the church out of debt. They need to raise a lot more for the church to run efficiently. (Lake News/Feb. 7, 1996)
“That’s a lot of hundreds, but it adds up to only $5,000 which really isn’t much in the world of debt. Rev. Dr. Cullene Bryant, Minister of the Lake Cowichan United Church needs to raise that money which would get the church out of debt. They need to raise a lot more for the church to run efficiently. (Lake News/Feb. 7, 1996)
‘Grandma rolls over 30,000 pennies. Gloria Carnell, grandmother of Nicole Stock and member of Nicole’s penny crew, rolls pennies collected from Palsson Elementary school during the school’s first annual penny drive.’ (Rick Diakiw/Lake News, Jan. 31, 1996)

Flashback: Sawmill, bus stops, safe houses and garbage

Welcome to Lake Flashback. Reporter Sarah Simpson has been combing through old…

‘Grandma rolls over 30,000 pennies. Gloria Carnell, grandmother of Nicole Stock and member of Nicole’s penny crew, rolls pennies collected from Palsson Elementary school during the school’s first annual penny drive.’ (Rick Diakiw/Lake News, Jan. 31, 1996)
’A Town of Lake Cowichan crew works at snow removal in downtown Lake Cowichan, last week.’ (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette Jan. 19, 2011)
’A Town of Lake Cowichan crew works at snow removal in downtown Lake Cowichan, last week.’ (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette Jan. 19, 2011)
‘Lake Cowichan Secondary School Grade 12 students Tina Delainey and Kelsey Johnston, from left, sort bottles and cans during the graduating class’s latest fund-raising effort, at Saywell Park, Saturday, Jan. 8. The students raised about $2,000. Graduation plans include a prom and a dry grad trip to go white water rafting, at a cost of about $500 per student. There are 53 potential future graduates in Grade 12. The students’ last bottle drive, in September, raised about $3,600.’ (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette, 2011)
’Lake Cowichan Secondary School Grade 12 students Tina Delainey and Kelsey Johnston, from left, sort bottles and cans during the graduating class’s latest fund-raising effort, at Saywell Park, Saturday, Jan. 8. The students raised about $2,000. Graduation plans include a prom and a dry grad trip to go white water rafting, at a cost of about $500 per student. There are 53 potential future graduates in Grade 12. The students’ last bottle drive, in September, raised about $3,600.’ (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette, 2011)
‘Lake Cowichan Secondary School Grade 12 students Tina Delainey and Kelsey Johnston, from left, sort bottles and cans during the graduating class’s latest fund-raising effort, at Saywell Park, Saturday, Jan. 8. The students raised about $2,000. Graduation plans include a prom and a dry grad trip to go white water rafting, at a cost of about $500 per student. There are 53 potential future graduates in Grade 12. The students’ last bottle drive, in September, raised about $3,600.’ (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette, 2011)
’Lake Cowichan Secondary School Grade 12 students Tina Delainey and Kelsey Johnston, from left, sort bottles and cans during the graduating class’s latest fund-raising effort, at Saywell Park, Saturday, Jan. 8. The students raised about $2,000. Graduation plans include a prom and a dry grad trip to go white water rafting, at a cost of about $500 per student. There are 53 potential future graduates in Grade 12. The students’ last bottle drive, in September, raised about $3,600.’ (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette, 2011)
Signs are being placed this July around Lake Cowichan and the region asking tourists to follow the rules around COVID-19 while visiting local businesses and other attractions and facilities this summer. (Submitted graphic)

Year in Review: Top headlines from Lake Cowichan in 2020, part II

May Tubing the Cowichan River has been banned for the summer of…

Signs are being placed this July around Lake Cowichan and the region asking tourists to follow the rules around COVID-19 while visiting local businesses and other attractions and facilities this summer. (Submitted graphic)
“An angel tells part of the Christmas story while shepherds and angels keep watch during the Yount School Christmas nativity pageant.” (Lake News, Dec. 22, 1980)

Lake Flashback: Workers cleared, Jaws used, payment sought

Do you remember these stories from Cowichan Lake?

“An angel tells part of the Christmas story while shepherds and angels keep watch during the Yount School Christmas nativity pageant.” (Lake News, Dec. 22, 1980)
‘Santa at the Co-op was a big success with not only small children, but even his helpers had a big kiss for him, for the job he does so well. Sitting on Santa’s knee is Kimberly Knott (left) and Nina Padjen (right).” (Lake News, Dec. 20, 1995)

Flashback: Vandals, a new pub, and development delays

Remember these stories from Cowichan Lake?

‘Santa at the Co-op was a big success with not only small children, but even his helpers had a big kiss for him, for the job he does so well. Sitting on Santa’s knee is Kimberly Knott (left) and Nina Padjen (right).” (Lake News, Dec. 20, 1995)
“Lake Cowichan Fire Department members, outside Country Grocer during their third annual Christmas Hamper Toy Drive event, Saturday, Dec. 11 [2010], wherein they collect non-perishable foods, monetary donations, and toys, for Cowichan Lake Community Services’ Christmas Hamper program. Throughout Friday evening and Saturday, the firefighters collected $1,419 and four truck loads of toys and food. The Christmas hampers will be put together by volunteers at the Centennial Hall, throughout the day, Wednesday, December 15, and distributed to recipients the following day.” (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette/Dec. 15, 2010)
“Lake Cowichan Fire Department members, outside Country Grocer during their third annual Christmas Hamper Toy Drive event, Saturday, Dec. 11 [2010], wherein they collect non-perishable foods, monetary donations, and toys, for Cowichan Lake Community Services’ Christmas Hamper program. Throughout Friday evening and Saturday, the firefighters collected $1,419 and four truck loads of toys and food. The Christmas hampers will be put together by volunteers at the Centennial Hall, throughout the day, Wednesday, December 15, and distributed to recipients the following day.” (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette/Dec. 15, 2010)
‘Eileen Pilkington, right, and her daughter Brenda, in an entranceway to their Lions Christmas House yard, which is sprinkled with decorations. Every room in their house is covered with Christmas decorations, and Santa Claus may even pay them a visit. The house will open to the public Dec. 4, from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. through to Dec. 12.’ (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette, Dec. 1, 2010)

Flashback: Christmas, ICBC relents, and a BCFP fine

Remember these stories from Lake Cowichan?

‘Eileen Pilkington, right, and her daughter Brenda, in an entranceway to their Lions Christmas House yard, which is sprinkled with decorations. Every room in their house is covered with Christmas decorations, and Santa Claus may even pay them a visit. The house will open to the public Dec. 4, from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. through to Dec. 12.’ (Tyler Clarke/Lake Cowichan Gazette, Dec. 1, 2010)
“Say cheese, uh, apple… nine-year-old Jason Moran and mum Bonnie are all smiles over a number of sales made during “apple day” of local cubs and beavers. Jason, a wolf cub, was one of 22 boys who, with the ready assistance of mothers, sold several boxes of apples in money-raising scheme for various projects.” (<em>The Lake News</em> Nov. 26, 1980)

Flashback: Crime wave, canoe misfortune and a highway lawsuit

Welcome to Lake Flashback. Reporter Sarah Simpson has been combing through old…

“Say cheese, uh, apple… nine-year-old Jason Moran and mum Bonnie are all smiles over a number of sales made during “apple day” of local cubs and beavers. Jason, a wolf cub, was one of 22 boys who, with the ready assistance of mothers, sold several boxes of apples in money-raising scheme for various projects.” (<em>The Lake News</em> Nov. 26, 1980)
“Jeff Abbott sinks in a mass of mud where a tributary to Coon Creek earlier ran. The creek supplies 60 families in Youbou with drinking water.” (Lake News, Nov. 19, 1980)

Flashback: Winter tires, winter weather, watershed watch

Remember these stories from Lake Cowichan

“Jeff Abbott sinks in a mass of mud where a tributary to Coon Creek earlier ran. The creek supplies 60 families in Youbou with drinking water.” (Lake News, Nov. 19, 1980)
“Truck and car meet on ‘new’ highway. Is there more danger now?” (Lake News, Nov. 12, 1980)

Flashback: A boy’s birthday food drive, Remembrance Day, and Highway 18 damages

Welcome to Lake Flashback. Reporter Sarah Simpson has been combing through old…

“Truck and car meet on ‘new’ highway. Is there more danger now?” (Lake News, Nov. 12, 1980)
The crew of the BK716 bomber recently recovered in the Netherlands. From left: Sgt. Ronald Kennedy (flight engineer), Sgt. Charles Bell (bomb aimer), F/O John Michael Campbell (radio operator), F/O John Harris (pilot), F/O Harry Farrington (navigator), F/Sgt. John McCaw (tail gunner), Sgt. Leonard Shrubsall (mid-upper gunner). (Historical photo)

REMEMBRANCE DAY: Missing, presumed dead

As of 2016, 501 WWII crash locations in the Netherlands which have yet to be investigated.

  • Nov 11, 2020
The crew of the BK716 bomber recently recovered in the Netherlands. From left: Sgt. Ronald Kennedy (flight engineer), Sgt. Charles Bell (bomb aimer), F/O John Michael Campbell (radio operator), F/O John Harris (pilot), F/O Harry Farrington (navigator), F/Sgt. John McCaw (tail gunner), Sgt. Leonard Shrubsall (mid-upper gunner). (Historical photo)
The mushroom clouds set off by the bombing of Japanese cities Hiroshima, left and Nagasaki, right, by American forces during the Second World War. (Charles Levy photos)

REMEMBRANCE DAY: Nanaimo residents took news of atomic bombs, war’s end in stride

The Japanese conceded 60 per cent of the city (four square miles) had been “turned to ashes”

  • Nov 11, 2020
The mushroom clouds set off by the bombing of Japanese cities Hiroshima, left and Nagasaki, right, by American forces during the Second World War. (Charles Levy photos)
Métis Veteran William Hurteau who served in the Second World War finally received a $20,000 Recognition Payment and an apology from Canada in Sudbury, Ontario in 2020. (metisveterans.ca photo)

REMEMBRANCE DAY: Our Métis veterans are finally acknowledged

A formal apology from the federal government and the promise of compensation

  • Nov 11, 2020
Métis Veteran William Hurteau who served in the Second World War finally received a $20,000 Recognition Payment and an apology from Canada in Sudbury, Ontario in 2020. (metisveterans.ca photo)
Sir Arthur Currie is widely lauded as one of Canada’s ableist war commanders. (Canadian War Museum)

REMEMBRANCE DAY: Honouring Canada’s greatest general is long overdue

General Sir Arthur William Currie, Canada’s first full general, was the Allies’ ablest corps commander

  • Nov 11, 2020
Sir Arthur Currie is widely lauded as one of Canada’s ableist war commanders. (Canadian War Museum)
Japanese Canadian fishermen having their boat confiscated by a Royal Canadian Navy Officer, 1941. (Library and Archives Canada photo)

REMEMBRANCE DAY: January 1, 1942: a low point for Canadian morale

Only two ‘miracles’ to date, Dunkirk and the Battle of Britain, had given any real cause for joy

  • Nov 11, 2020
Japanese Canadian fishermen having their boat confiscated by a Royal Canadian Navy Officer, 1941. (Library and Archives Canada photo)