‘We move on:’ Flames head coach Bill Peters resigns after racial slur allegations

‘We move on:’ Flames head coach Bill Peters resigns after racial slur allegations

Exit comes after former NHL-er Akim Aliu tweeted that he been the target of a racial slur

After a firestorm of controversy amid allegations of racial slurs and physical abuse of players in previous jobs, embattled Calgary Flames head coach Bill Peters resigned Friday.

General manager Brad Treliving made the announcement at a Calgary press conference saying Peters voluntarily sent him a resignation letter earlier that morning.

“This is the most difficult thing in my career,” Treliving told reporters.

“The subject matter we’ve been dealing with over the last few days is difficult, it’s hard, and it does not in any way reflect the core values of the Calgary Flames.”

Geoff Ward will take over as interim head coach. Ward had been acting as caretaker head coach while Peters was sidelined during investigations into the allegations and led the Flames to a 3-2 overtime win at Buffalo on Wednesday.

“For me it really hasn’t sunk in yet and it’s going to take a little bit of time,” Ward said after Calgary’s first home practice since the controversy began.

“I’m still reeling from it myself. Our focus right now is trying to prepare to play the Ottawa Senators and all the other stuff for us has to stay in the background.”

Peters’ resignation comes after former NHL player Akim Aliu tweeted Monday night that he had a racial slur directed his way by a former coach in 2009-10 while a member of the American Hockey League’s Rockford IceHogs.

The 30-year-old Aliu, a player of colour, never referred to Peters by name, but did reference Calgary’s airport code “YYC” when writing about the alleged coach involved in the matter.

Then on Tuesday, former NHL defenceman Michal Jordan alleged Peters kicked him while the two were with the Carolina Hurricanes.

Peters issued an apology in a letter addressed to Treliving on Wednesday night.

The apology did not mention Aliu, who released his own statement on Twitter on Thursday calling Peters’ letter “misleading, insincere and concerning.”

Peters’ resignation comes after a lengthy process that included investigations by the Flames and the NHL.

“If I’ve not met anyone’s time agenda, I apologize but it was more important to make sure we get all of the information.”

Treliving said he personally found the allegations against Peters “repulsive” but the investigation had to be done fairly.

“I know everybody wants a really quick gavel to come into play. We had to make sure it was done thoroughly.”

The NHL said in a statement that its review of the incident is ongoing and that interviews with “relevant individuals” including Aliu are scheduled.

Forward Matthew Tkachuk said news of Peters’ resignation was expected.

“I think that it was most likely the best outcome for what the team had put into their investigation and with the allegations and everything,” Tkachuk said.

“I mean this investigation took however many days and I felt they did a good job of it.”

Flames captain Mark Giordano said the past four days have been tough and the only escape for the players was on the ice.

“At the end of the day all we can do as players is move forward. We know in society there’s no place for that and the decision, however they came to it, was made,” he said.

“I think they did a good job.”

READ MORE: Hockey reckoning amid renewed call for independent body to probe abuse

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