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Violence unacceptable, no matter the political cause

We can’t be selective, ignoring violence on one side while condemning its use by others.

Violence unacceptable, no matter the political cause

Violence used for political ends is unacceptable. All violence. Law abiding Canadians understand this, and that is why we are shocked and disappointed when we find that either side of the political spectrum has employed violent acts to achieve their ends. The storming of the U.S. capitol building was an inexcusable and horrendous event that demonstrates how far radical elements will go in trying to impose their will on the people.

But violence in every form should be condemned. We can’t be selective, ignoring violence on one side while condemning its use by others. It’s all bad. Last summer violence was employed by radical groups in 48 of America’s 50 largest cities. Businesses were burned, people were shot and killed and “autonomous zones” like the CHAZ zone in Seattle were created, ostensibly beyond the reach of law and order. Seattle, Kenosha, Minneapolis and dozens of other communities suffered violence and chaos, and Portland, which suffered most of all, is still unstable after hundreds of days of inexcusable destruction.

The violence stemmed from anarchist and revolutionary groups and involved organizations like Antifa, a group that makes no secret of its desire to overthrow democratic society through violent means. Referring to this activity as “mostly peaceful demonstrations” or even as a potential “summer of love,” as stated by Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan, is to excuse one kind of violence because you like its political connections while condemning another.

Frankly speaking, it’s nonsense. If others can tacitly support these activities and even support bail money for its violent offenders, then the approval of violence and death, as long as it supports partisan interests, has reached new and contemptible levels. Rejecting this kind of violence is something we should all recommit ourselves to. The alternative, for all reasonable civilized people, may be too frightening to contemplate.

Perry Foster

Duncan

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