People who don’t vote often think there’s not point, or they don’t need to

The bulk of people that don’t vote could generally be placed into the category “there’s no point”.

People who don’t vote often think there’s not point, or they don’t need to

Re: “More people need to go vote” (Robert Barron column, Oct. 25, Citizen).

The bulk of people that don’t vote could generally be placed into the category “there’s no point”. In the “there’s no point” category you have two main camps. In one camp you have people who won’t vote because “all the parties are the same” in terms of issues they think are important. You see this a lot with “single-issue voters”. Their ideal party just doesn’t exist, and none of the existent parties come even remotely close enough to their values for any hint of support. If they can’t vote their exact values, they won’t, and chasing for their vote is likely an exercise in futility, unless someone can somehow convince them to shift to a “take what you can get” mentality where a person would vote for a party, while not a perfect match, that comes closest in terms of a person’s values, in order to avoid having someone get in that completely clashes with their values.

The second camp is the “don’t even NEED to vote” because they’re happy with whatever keeps getting in (in the Valley’s case, usually the NDP), and so long as other people are electing what they’re perfectly happy to settle with, they’re not going to vote, either. You see this a lot in places where one party has been favored for so long, it’s been decades or even almost a century since another party or at least a party from the opposite side of the political spectrum got elected. It truly is a “why bother” situation. So if the election ends up in an NDP representative, and the person at least thinks NDP is “good enough”, what even is the point of that person voting? The only thing that would get them off their butts to vote is if a candidate that represents a party they absolutely can’t abide has a solid chance of winning over the regular choice.

April J. Gibson

Duncan

Just Posted

REMEMBRANCE DAY: Old wristwatch is an echo of the First World War

A chance discovery in a box of old watches recalls heroic Cowichan Valley brothers.

REMEMBRANCE DAY: Capt. J.S. Dobbie’s last letter to his mother and father

“We have both lost a very fine friend…a sportsman and gentleman of the very highest.”

Guest column: A letter from home

By Jack Bridges My dad was born in 1897 in Ontario. Canada… Continue reading

Remembrance Day nuggets

In the last 100 days of the First World War no fewer than 30 soldiers earned the Victoria Cross

REMEMBRANCE DAY: Canada’s First Nations soldiers

“First Nation soldiers were not recognized for their service until recently and received no pensions”

VIDEO: Hong Kong police shoot protester, man set on fire

It was the second protester shot since the demonstrations began in early June

Sportsnet fires Don Cherry after negative comments about immigrants

Don Cherry had said immigrants don’t wear poppies like other Canadians do

Trudeau’s new cabinet: Gender parity because it’s 2019? Or due to competence?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will soon appoint his new cabinet

Canada among three G20 countries least likely to hit emissions targets

It says Canada, South Korea and Australia are the farthest off

Conservatives’ Scheer wants Trudeau to open Parliament Nov. 25

That’s five days after Justin Trudeau is scheduled to swear in a new cabinet

Last remaining Centurion tank from the Korean War makes its journey ‘home’ to B.C.

Tank arrives in B.C. the day before Remembrance Day after a more than 4,500-kilometre transfer

‘Your vehicle burns a lot of fuel:’ Victoria drivers wake up to angry notes

‘This handbill was left on your vehicle because your vehicle burns a lot of fuel,’ notes read

Canadians mark Remembrance Day this morning

This year exactly 101 years to the day after the end of the First World War

Devils strike early, hang on for 2-1 win over Canucks

Vancouver now 0-8-3 in last 11 games versus New Jersey

Most Read