Past time for a final resting place in town

We all choose to remember our loved ones in different ways, but for many people, it’s important to have a

We all choose to remember our loved ones in different ways, but for many people, it’s important to have a place where they can go to find solace.

It can be a grave marked with a headstone, a bench with a plaque — or a niche in a columbarium.

To date, Lake Cowichan and the surrounding communities have had no local place for someone to be buried, and indeed, no place like a columbarium where someone could be remembered.

Residents must drive sometimes a significant distance to visit the graves or other markers of loved ones in Duncan, Cedar or even farther afield.

We think it is past time for Lake Cowichan to offer a place in the community where people have the option of remembering their loved ones.

While of course we can think of those we’ve lost at any time and in any place, whether it’s on the lakeshore or in the forest, in our kitchen or while we shovel the snow from the driveway, for many a specific memorial place, dedicated to remembering can offer something that people need.

It can provide a time and place set aside for processing emotions. It can be a place you can show to future generations where you can share the stories of those who have gone before.

It can be a spot where you can block out all of the everday things that clutter our minds and our days, and provide a meditative calm where we can honour those we’ve lost.

Which is why we think a columbarium is an excellent idea for Lake Cowichan, and we applaud the town for seriously scouting for appropriate land.

An actual graveyard is problematic, as it requires a large amount of land and is seriously limited by type of terrain.

There are those whose traditions require burial, of course, and it would be nice if they, too, at some point in the future, could have somewhere that their loved ones can rest, in the community they called home.

But there are roadblocks and expenses that make such an endeavour tough at this time.

But a columbarium is certainly a step in the right direction, as it requires significantly less land and can accommodate many at minimal cost.

Such a site should cause no objections from neighbours, as they tend to be quiet places that are well cared for and made to be attractive.

It shouldn’t cost the taxpayers a bunch of money, either, as these sites usually pay for themselves through fees for the service provided.

A columbarium for the town is an idea whose time has come.

Just Posted

All the way from England: couple lays wreath at Duncan Cenotaph to honour fallen soldier

Charles Hugh Pearson Lipscomb died in France during First World War

Cowichan Lake Pickleball Club hosting first invitational tourney

The Lake Cowichan pickleball courts on Cowichan Avenue will be busy this… Continue reading

Cowichan Crime Stoppers most wanted of the week

Do you know where these people are?

‘They were just gone’: presentation in Duncan on project delving into history of Japanese Canadians

Cowichan Valley Museum & Archives hosting a presentation by the Landscapes of Injustice project team

BC Summer Games legacy money distributed throughout Cowichan Valley

Six organizations split $120,000 remaining from 2018 event

VIDEO: Missing teens named as suspects in three northern B.C. killings

Kam McLeod and Bryer Schmegelsky are wanted in the deaths of Lucas Fowler, Chynna Deese, unknown man

Vancouver Island teacher suspended for professional misconduct

Grade 8 shop teacher admits to use of vulgar language and profanities toward students, parents

Northern B.C. double homicide, suspicious death: A timeline of what we know

Two teens from Port Alberni are now wanted Canada-wide in connection to the three deaths

B.C. wine industry legend Harry McWatters dies

Among his accomplishments, McWatters founded the province’s first estate winery, Sumac Ridge Estate

Provincial health body refuses to release full findings of cancer triage system audit

Information and Privacy Commissioner asked to review redactions

Southern resident killer whale died of blunt trauma, likely from ship

J34 was found more than two years ago near Sechelt, but the necropsy findings have now been released

B.C. rail crossing death highlights risks for people in wheelchairs: watchdog

Transportation Safety Board points to ‘persistent risks faced by persons using assistive devices’

B.C. teens wanted in double homicide, suspicious death spotted in Manitoba

Kam McLeod and Bryer Schmegelsky were thought to have been seen in the Gillam area

Vancouver Island man wanted after walking away from halfway house in Victoria

Warrant issued for Jesse Goodale, convicted of aggravated assault

Most Read