A welcome feathered visitor to the garden. (Mary Lowther photo)

Mary Lowther column: The benefits of gardening without pesticides

Do I want a yard humming with birds and bees and croaking with frogs, or a Silent Spring?

By Mary Lowther

All our efforts to grow food without pesticides pay off when we read that the World Health Organization has classified the most widely used pesticide, glyphosate, as a probable carcinogen.

El Salvador has banned the use of glyphosate because they are convinced that thousands of agricultural workers died from exposure to the stuff. Glyphosate is the main ingredient in Roundup, which has been touted to be the least harmful of chemical pesticides.

It takes a bit more effort to grow food without pesticides, but once the garden is underway the protocols become routine and are easy to maintain. I’ve learned to work around some pests, like slugs, realizing that I can’t grow strawberries in the spring or expect to reap a harvest in a cold frame in fall. Perhaps there’s a solution for this that I haven’t found yet, but there’s enough other food to eat from the garden. Some methods to keep unwanted pests and weeds at bay confer other benefits, like using soaker hoses that only water the plants we want, allowing the rest of the soil to become too dry and hot for slugs and weeds, thus using so little water that we can still irrigate even during Stage 3 watering restrictions.

Some cities in Canada have banned the general use of many pesticides, including glyphosate, citing the Precautionary Principle that states that there is a social responsibility to protect the public from exposure to harm, when scientific investigation has found a plausible risk. I’m with them.

Given that glyphosate prevents the uptake of nutrients, why would I use it in my garden? Some studies have shown that it also disrupts hormones in frogs, rendering them sterile. Do I want a yard humming with birds and bees and croaking with frogs, or a Silent Spring?

When I’m in my garden, I’m not just feeding the family; I’m enriching the soil for future generations, hopefully leaving the place in better condition than when I got here. I’m learning from those who came before, who grew food for centuries before the advent of pesticides. Gardening mavens show us ways to improve soils and not wear them out; the value of recycling minerals and other nutrients; the delicate balance in nature and the need to not squander our inheritance.

Please contact mary_lowther@yahoo.ca with questions and suggestions since I need all the help I can get.

Just Posted

Local Cowichan youth shines in national writing contest

Cowichan Tribe member Danika Smith places fifth in her category in Indigenous Arts & Stories contest

Child hit and killed in driveway in Cobble Hill

The driver of the vehicle remained at the crash scene and is fully cooperating

Cobble Hill’s Price sprints to first Dirt Cup championship

Robbie Price’s first win on the Lucas Oil American Sprint Car Series… Continue reading

Cowichan police warn of cryptocurrency scam

More than $64,000 in losses so far

Campers hailed heroes in rock face rescue at Cowichan Provincial Park

The campers quickly noticed the man in distress and jumped into the river to swim across.

VIDEO: Killer whale steals fisherman’s catch off North Coast

Fishing duel results in eager orca snagging salmon in Prince Rupert

Fate of accused in Canadian couple’s 1987 killings in jury’s hands

William Talbott’s lawyer says DNA doesn’t prove murder

PHOTOS: North Island home gutted in fire deemed ‘suspicious’

No injuries reported; firefighters prevented blaze from spreading

Eating sandwiches, putting on makeup behind the wheel could land you a fine

RCMP say if you cause an accident while eating you could be penalized

Cat badly hurt in animal trap was likely stuck for days, B.C. owner says

Blu, a three-year-old house cat, suffered severe damage to his hind leg after being stuck in trap for days

Vancouver Island woman assaulted after confronting thief

RCMP warn residents to call for police assistance

Island Health issues safer drug-use tips ahead of music festival season

Health authority aims to reduce overdose risks at festivals

40 cats surrendered in apparent hoarding at B.C. home

Officers found the cats living among piles of garbage and feces, suffering from fleas

Vancouver Aquarium drops cetacean ban lawsuit in new lease agreement

Ocean Wise CEO Lasse Gustavsson called the updated lease an exciting new chapter for the aquarium

Most Read