Left must unite and vote as a block

Sixty per cent of Canadians vote for left leaning progressive parties.

Left must unite and vote as a block

See the forest for the frees.

Listen up Canadians. Don’t be seduced by tax credits, energy corridors, pharmacare, dental care, child daycare etc., to lose sight of what is real.

Sixty per cent of Canadians vote for left leaning progressive parties. This is significant and conservatives are very aware of what this means to their chances of forming government.

This election the country wants a leg up to a better life and is worried about the environment. This means a progressive agenda ought to resume power after the election.

But we could end up with a Conservative government for the next four years.

A far right, cost cutting, retrospective Conservative government is easy to come by. Plainly — progressive votes are spread over four parties — the 60 per cent becomes (30 Liberal – 15 NDP – 10 Green – 5 Bloc Quebecois or 32-14-10-4 or 33-14-8-5) — check Poll Tracker on the CBC website as subtle change happens daily. This split creates an opportunity for the conservative base to come up the middle to form government with 34-35 per cent. Surprise! It’s not that conservatives have a big lead over liberal thinking Canadians, it’s that conservatives — both moderate and extremist (barring Mr. Bernier’s group) — under one party, band together and vote as one block. Think about that.

Shopping party platforms won’t represent your needs better; it confuses the picture and splits the progressive vote.

Remember the splash Mr. Scheer created attending the Pro-Pipeline United We Roll Protest on Capital Hill back in February 2019. He was more than willing to be seen rolling with that crowd.

Approaching a Liberal government the next four years will be easier and garner better results than approaching Conservatives who once muzzled scientists, and only share vague and elusive promises in their deficient environmental plan and limiting tax credits that assist middle/high income earners best. I’d rather work with the devil I know than the devil that won’t march with environmentalists or the LGBTQ community.

Be angry with Trudeau, but don’t punish Mother Earth or fellow Canadians.

Vote sensibly. I am speaking to the undecided voter when I say: it is a waste of time comparing and contrasting party platforms (it only justifies media’s self-importance and panders to leaders who promise the moon, knowing they will never form government). Review the platforms of the two parties that can form government.

Don’t like these leaders?

Vote as a block anyway, then challenge the hell out of Trudeau. Don’t betray what progressives consider their common goals to allow a conservative agenda to slip through.

I can’t emphasize this enough. Re-elect Liberals. Then make your case for your programs; make your needs known. Community forums have been re-introduced under the Liberals. Now I am speaking to the voting youth: democracy is so easily replaced with complacency especially when the remaining progressive parties do our work for us. Take back your voice; understand the system we do have, and work within it better. This will not be the first or last time we’ll be making “hard” choices. So make sure you go to vote.

Climate change will ask us to make deep and alarming compromises, no one will be exempt. Find comfort knowing 60 per cent of Canadians have each other’s back, have the same calling and understanding care for our society. Sixty per cent believe science and intrinsically know what is real. Universal healthcare in Canada was delivered by the 60 per cent.

Organize, protest and challenge the Liberals for the priorities we hold dear. It’s our duty.

If you believe environmentalists then you know we are working against the clock. Let’s make sure progressives are re-elected. Mother Earth will thank you for it. Our children and grandchildren will thank us for it.

Vote as a block. Vote to re-elect. As the 60 per cent, more can be done.

Catherine Worthingham

Duncan

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