Editorial: Time for a #TrashTag spring cleaning in Cowichan Valley

Heaps of clothing spilling out of garbage bags amidst grass and bushes.

We’ve all seen it at one time or another. Heaps of clothing spilling out of garbage bags amidst grass and bushes. Broken sinks, desks and kitchen appliances glinting in the light among the trees. Paint tins, old wood, shingles and assorted other refuse pock-marked along the roadside, sad remnants of someone’s life.

The CVRD is getting on board this month with #TrashTag, an international Twitter-inspired community clean-up effort.

Groups can register, do a clean-up of a spot they know to be infested with illegally dumped trash, and then dispose of it for free, among other incentives. It’s a great idea, and one our communities can sadly use after a winter of people doing everything from roadside littering as they walk or drive, figuring it will disappear into the snow, to taking truck loads of accumulated junk out to the “country” and making it everyone else’s problem.

There’s also the inexplicable decision some folks make to collect up all their yard and garden waste and illegally dump it in the woods.

A big concern that you might not have thought of is the spread of invasive species when you dump your yard and garden waste into the bush instead of disposing of it properly. You know that broom, buttercup or parrot feather that you yanked out? You may have removed it from your property, but you effectively just set it free in an unsuspecting environment with no oversight to keep it under control. What do you think will happen to it after that? Once again, it becomes everyone’s problem instead of just yours. And it can quickly mushroom into something that will cost us collectively thousands upon thousands of dollars and time and effort to try to fix, if it can ever really be fixed at all. Do you really think you save if communities then have to use your tax money to clean up your mess?

It’s infuriating, since all of this garden waste can be taken to the local transfer stations for free.

So this April, be a #TrashTag-er, not an illegal dumper.

Just Posted

Alistair MacGregor column: The Canada Revenue Agency wants to hear from Canadians about improving services

The purpose of the consultations is to listen and learn from Canadians

Robert Barron column: It’s good to see kids excited about education

A travelling salesman banged on our door and showed my parents an encyclopedia set

Cowichan Power and Sail Squadron celebrates its 60th anniversary

Many who take courses go on to become Canadian Power Squadron members.

Andrea Rondeau column: Crime Stoppers is back, plus, why crime is important to write about

As a newspaper we cover crime as more than just entertainment.

Kick for the Cure crushes records

Soccer fundraiser for MS brings in more than $30,000

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

Coming up in Cowichan: Spend Father’s Day fishing, or head to the BC Forest Discovery Centre

Deadline coming to register for class reunion The Cowichan Secondary Class of… Continue reading

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Monkey spotted on late-night jaunt in Campbell River

Conservation officers also apparently looking for cougar in the area

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

Most Read