Editorial: Permanent state of drug crisis is unacceptable

No indication that the opioid crisis is waning says that what we’re doing isn’t working.

It was good news and bad news all rolled into one. Last week it was announced that Duncan’s overdose prevention site will continue to operate for another year, and their lease has been extended on Trunk Road.

That’s terrible news in the sense that it means we still have a pressing need for the site. It means there are still many people in our community addicted to drugs who risk fentanyl and overdose on a regular basis. An Island Health spokesperson said the opioid crisis we find ourselves in isn’t slowing down, let alone coming to an end. There’s no light on that horizon.

On the positive side, there have been no deaths among the 18,000 visits to the site since it opened in 2016. So it is doing its job: saving people’s lives. We only wish that job wasn’t necessary.

The overdose prevention site — which risks becoming a permanent temporary measure — is triage, needed, yes, but not long-term strategy.

The fact that there is no indication that the opioid crisis is waning says that what we’re doing isn’t working. We need to really think outside the North American box where we treat drugs primarily as a crime problem rather than as a public health problem. By any measure, the war on drugs, a concept we’ve imported from our neighbours to the south, has been an abject failure.

And no, it’s not acceptable to just wait and let those who are addicted die off one after another so the problem is solved by attrition, as we’ve sometimes heard suggested. Such an idea is horrific, and the antithesis of the morals and actions of a civilized society.

Right now, far too often, we’re treating the symptoms of the problem, whether it’s crimes like thefts, as addicts look to support their habits, or opening overdose prevention locations.

We will probably never totally eliminate drug addiction from our communities. But we need to look at root causes and invest in tackling those, or we will never change the status quo — and we don’t believe a permanent state of crisis is acceptable.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Battle of Fairy Creek: blockade launched to save Vancouver Island old-growth

‘Forest Defenders’ occupy road to prevent logging company from reaching Port Renfrew-area watershed

Cowichan residents can Climb for Alzheimer’s in their own backyard

for the first time ever, open to anyone, anywhere in the province

Drivesmart column: Mandatory alcohol screening

If you have to drive, don’t drink. If you drink, don’t drive.

VIDEO: Disabled Vancouver Island feline teaching foster kittens ‘how to cat’

Life goes from sour to sweet for Lemon, an adopted cat from B.C. SPCA Nanaimo

$45K in donations received after couple’s sudden death in Tulameen

Sarah MacDermid, 31, and Casey Bussiere, 37, died August long weekend

Famous Yukon-based bhangra dancer brings movements of joy to Long Beach

Infamous dancer is exploring Vancouver Island, visiting the B.C. Legislature and other destinations

COVID-19 could mean curtains for film and TV extras

Background performers worry they’re being replaced by mannequins on film and TV sets

Laid-off B.C. hotel workers begin hunger strike demanding job protection

Laid-off workers not sure what they’ll do when government support programs end

‘Huckleberry’ the bear killed after B.C. residents admit to leaving garbage out for videos

North Shore Black Bear Society said it was local residents who created a ‘death sentence’ for bear

Researchers find cannabis use in pregnancy linked to greater risk of autism

Researchers caution findings only show association — not cause and effect

Small Manitoba town mourning after well-liked teens killed by tornado

Melita residents feeling profound grief after the deaths of Shayna Barnesky and Carter Tilbury

Antonio Banderas says he’s tested positive for coronavirus

Acclaimed actor celebrating his 60th birthday in quarantine

Most Read