CRA jumps the gun on changes to Child Tax Benefit

CRA mistakenly applied changes to the Child Tax Benefit six months too early, short-changing Canadian families.

On Sept.19 a mistake by the Canada Revenue Agency was made public.

The CRA mistakenly applied changes to the Child Tax Benefit six months too early, short-changing Canadian families.

The Conservative government made changes to the child tax benefit in the 2010 budget. The new legislation was supposed to take effect on June 1, 2011 but the CRA started applying the new rules in January, six months too early.

As a result, a $20 million error that affected nearly 20,000 Canadian families who received $1,000 to $1,500 less than they were entitled to.

New Democrats called on the government to take immediate action to reimburse the affected families, many of whom depend on the Child Tax Benefit to meet every day needs like rent, utilities and food.

If your family was receiving the Child Tax Benefit between January and June last year, please keep an eye on the CRA website for updates: cra-arc.gc.ca/bnfts/cctb/menu-eng.html. I will also post updates on my website at jeancrowder.ca.

Under the Conservatives, the majority of Canadians can no longer count on Employment Insurance.

It’s bad enough that six in 10 Canadians do not qualify for EI when they lose their employment.

But in their 2012 omnibus budget, the government changed the rules again to cut you off EI unless you accept any job the deemed “suitable.”

That means teachers, nurses, tradespeople and other specialists will leave their careers paths to take low-wage jobs.

Now we’re learning that the new rules around part-time work on EI also announced in Budget 2012 are not working the way anyone expected.

The old rules allowed people to earn up to 40 percent of their EI benefits before their wages were clawed back. The new rules include a claw back of 50 per cent of every single dollar earned.

But workers at minimum-wage jobs are finding the new rules remove any incentive to find a few extra hours of work since they can only earn half their normal wages, which often doesn’t cover the costs of going to work, like transportation or child care.

The only bright spot is that this is a pilot project, not a new policy. So there is still an opportunity to make it work for low-wage workers and actually encourage people to find those part-time jobs.

I encourage you to email the minister responsible, Diane Finley, at diane.finley@parl.gc.ca and ask her to make EI work for all Canadians.

 

 

Just Posted

Shawnigan Lake man faces extradition

Anthony Michael Kubica appears in Vancouver courtroom

Enjoy ‘An Afternoon of Music’ with the Duncan Choral Society

The choir and their guests are ready to whisk your winter blues away

VIDEO: Cowichan’s Medfords take a tuneful trip through the 70s

It’s not the Seventies Show you expect, but you’ll be very happy with what you hear

B.C. Summer Games volunteers needed in Cowichan

Organizers need the engergy of about 3,000 volunteers

WATCH: Giant waves smash Ucluelet’s Amphitrite Point

Folks made their way to Ucluelet’s Amphitrite Point Lighthouse on Thursday, Jan.… Continue reading

Plan your Hometown Hockey weekend

Find your favourites on the Hometown Hockey schedule

Hometown Hockey: Cowichan Capitals events

On Jan. 20 there will be special features during the game for Hometown Hockey

Coming up in Cowichan: Rain workshop, Joseph Mairs Memorial, timely film

Participants are encouraged to bring their roof dimensions

World’s fastest log car made in B.C. sells for $350,000 US

Cedar Rocket auctioned off three times at Barrett-Jackson Co., netting $350,000 US for veterans

Bad timing: Shutdown spoils Trump’s one-year festivities

Trump spends day trying to hash out a deal with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer

RCMP nail sex toy thief

Shop owner plays a role in arrest

Ice-cream-eating bear draws controversy

An Alberta Wildlife Park posted a video this week of one of their bears going through a Dairy Queen drive-through

Fernie, RCMP go to court over city log books in fatal ammonia leak probe

Log books center stage in clashing of investigations between the city and RCMP

Most Read