Doreen Dinsdale speaks to council in North Cowichan at a packed public hearing last year expressing her concerns around a new housing development on Donnay Drive. Despite numerous delegations speaking against it, the project got the green light to proceed, with a 4-3 vote. (File photo)

Quamichan Lake residents plan to raise big voice

Neighbourhood densities and health of lake among top priorities

The residents of Quamichan Lake plan to be more vocal and proactive with the concerns of their neighbourhood.

More than 100 people attended the Quamichan Lake Neighbourhood Association’s AGM on March 1 and association president Marilyn Palmer said the increasing density of the mainly rural community was a major concern raised.

She said the association was formed just over a year ago largely as a means to express the neighbourhood’s concerns with the number and density of housing projects that are being planned for the area.

Palmer said the association made presentations at all three public hearings last year that were held by the Municipality of North Cowichan in regards to the controversial housing proposal for Donnay Drive.

The developer plans to build 38 residential units on 27 lots on a 2.65-hectare site just north of Maple Bay Elementary School.


“There were many delegations at those public hearings who spoke against the development plans, but council voted for it anyway,” Palmer said.

“Council listens but they don’t act consistently with what they hear. They are morally obliged to listen to the citizens and act on their concerns when they represent the views of the majority. This is still a democracy after all.”

Palmer said another important issue that was discussed at the AGM was the health of Quamichan Lake.

There have been at least four dog deaths around Quamichan Lake since 2016, and all are suspected to be caused by ingesting toxic blue-green algae from the lake.

North Cowichan set up a task force, consisting of staff and council members, along with water specialists, to study and seek solutions to the ongoing health issues related to the algae.

The task force concluded the nutrients that are causing the algae outbreak in the lake are coming from a number of sources, including urban runoff, and runoff from nearby agricultural lands, construction areas and logging sites.


“The health of the lake is a great concern for us,” Palmer said.

“We look to our municipal leaders to help stop the flow of material entering the lake that ends up with dead dogs. But the municipality is loathe to admit that developments are releasing harmful phosphates that are entering the lake and we don’t think they are taking this seriously enough.”

Palmer said there is strength in numbers and the association has decided to begin collaborating with other neighbourhood associations in North Cowichan to present a united front to council when dealing with municipal issues.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

A target all season, Brentwood pulls off repeat

Senior boys couldn’t hide under the radar this year

Different draw might have meant different result for Shawnigan

Stags place fifth in province after entering as eighth seed

Lexi Bainas column: We have so much talent in the Cowichan Valley. Let’s celebrate it!

On top of good shows at Valley for-profit venues, there are great amateur performances as well

Girls flag football league holding another session

Try the sport at McAdam Park Monday at 6 p.m.

Tribute honours country superstars Twitty and Lynn

This Saturday, March 17, at the Cowichan Performing Arts Centre, starting at 7:30 p.m.

UPDATED: Brake failure sees plane crash into gate; nobody injured

Rescue crews headed to the scene at Stamps and Henderson Roads.

Coming up in Cowichan: Public speaking, water, food preservation

The Justice for the Peace Island tour is stopping in Duncan on Wednesday, March 21.

Salmon Arm community cheers on Natalie Wilkie as she wins first gold medal

Local skier tops the podium in 7.5km race at the PyeongChang Paralympics

Experts: Society has a role in trying to prevent domestic violence

Experts are speaking out following the murder of a woman and her son in Ontario

Progress on fixing Phoenix pay system backlog could be short-lived: Ottawa

Feds have said they won’t try to recover money overpaid until all outstanding issues are fixed

Northern lights chasers in Canada discover new type named ‘Steve’

Phenomenon linked to a powerful current created by charged particles in Earth’s upper atmosphere

Washington state backs B.C. in pipeline dispute

Governor Jay Inslee says he is ‘allied’ with the province on Trans Mountain expansion projection

Dead rabbits found at Comox Valley Exhibition Grounds stoke concerns about Nanaimo virus

A B.C. wildlife veterinarian says a few of the dead bunnies will be sent for diagnosis next week.

SAY WHAT? Readers weigh in on high-speed rail to U.S.

B.C. to contribute $300,000 to a million-dollar business study on the proposed project

Most Read