New surveillance cameras to be installed at LCSS

If you have not received a copy of the LCSS newsletter, it can be found at the head office of the school upon request.

  • Nov. 22, 2011 4:00 p.m.

The Lake Cowichan Secondary School is a busy place of late.

Releasing a newsletter last Tuesday, the LCSS outlined what things new and exciting are happening at the school. These included the announcement of a new surveillance pilot project strategy, as well as updates on how the progress of the grade 12s graduation fund-raising drive.

If you have not received a copy of the LCSS newsletter, it can be found at the head office of the school upon request. The newsletter can also be emailed.

Surveillance Strategy

Eight surveillance cameras will soon be fixated on the exterior perimeter of LCSS.

After the LCSS suffered a recent string of break and enters, principal Peter Jory has put his foot down and taken a proactive approach to preventing future crime on the school’s premises. Jory has long been disgusted with the smashed windows, stolen and damaged computers, and other forms of vandalism the school has undergone in his four years as LCSS’s headmaster.

“I’ve been pushy for cameras since I walked in the door here,” said Jory.

He explained the eight cameras bore a total price tag of $800, a cost which Jory believes is minimal compared to the thousands of dollars already spent on repairing broken windows. Jory looks at the expense as an investment in counteracting mischievous behavior.

It’s expensive,” he said in regards to repair costs.

Jory noted the effectiveness of surveillance cameras, citing a teaching stint in Prince Rupert where the school he was working at successfully used the same tactic.

“It made a huge difference,” he said.

If the cameras prove effective, the LCSS may opt to purchase more surveillance equipment, potentially for the school’s interior as well.

“If we like how they are functioning and they seem to be doing the job, we’ll continue on that path. That’s the plan at this point,” Jory added.

Fundraising

The LCSS’s grade 12 class has been a hardworking bunch as the Christmas season draws near.

Pulling together funds for their dry grad celebration involves a tedious amount of volunteer work that often includes parents and teachers bearing a significant portion of this load.

The poinsettia drive, a potential car raffle and a hot dog sale the LCSS hosted at the Country Grocer on Saturday are all part of the efforts to meet the grad committee’s budget.

The LCSS newsletter commended students for selling an impressive $600 of poinsettias last weekend.

Jory, too has been impressed by the students enthusiasm to fundraise.

“I think it’s pretty ambitious. It will be neat if the kids can rally and pull this off. It will take a lot of work,” said LCSS’s principal.

Although Jory noted he is not a major component of the senior class’s fundraising drive, he holds a great deal of respect for these students and the hours they are putting in.

“This is great that they’re doing that. Grad  — all those functions can be quite expensive and the kids have to be fairly industrious to be able to do something interesting around graduation,” said Jory.

 

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