Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, B.C. (Google Maps)

B.C. university breached academic freedom of critical professor: probe

Thomson Rivers University banned Dereck Pyne from campus in May 2018 and suspended him that July

An investigation into the suspension of a British Columbia business professor who criticized his university has concluded the administration’s actions breached his academic freedom.

The committee of investigation, established by the Canadian Association of University Teachers, released its report Tuesday on the case involving Derek Pyne at Thompson Rivers University.

The university in Kamloops banned Pyne from campus in May 2018 and suspended him that July after he wrote about academics at the school paying to publish their work in deceptive journals that don’t require peer reviews.

The committee writes in its investigative report that the right of academics to criticize their administration and their institution is a widely recognized feature of academic freedom.

However, it says Thompson Rivers failed to understand academic freedom beyond a “narrow application” to support faculty members’ freedom to pursue fruitful avenues of research and publishing.

Neither the university nor Pyne, who returned to the school in January, immediately responded to requests for comment.

The committee found that Thompson Rivers suffers from a “broad institutional weakness” when it comes to academic freedom.

“Our investigation finds that the TRU Administration’s approach in managing workplace complaints against Dr. Pyne failed to properly consider his academic freedom as it applies to his … criticisms of the School of Business and Economics, its administrators and its faculty,” the report concludes.

The committee makes several recommendations, including removing the constraints placed on Pyne’s speech as a condition of his continuing employment as a faculty member.

It says the school should meaningfully consult with faculty to complete its academic freedom policy and review its human-resources practices to ensure that academic freedom is properly understood and protected.

The report also says the university breached Pyne’s privacy on a number of occasions and recommends it review its practices to ensure confidentiality is respected.

Pyne published an article in April 2017 titled, “The Awards of Predatory Publications at a Small Business School.” He did not name any professors or the university on which he based his research in the peer-reviewed Journal of Scholarly Publishing.

The article said 16 of 27 professors with research responsibilities paid so-called predatory journals that don’t require research to be peer reviewed to publish their work up to the end of 2015 and that they landed promotions.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Drivesmart column: Is it safe to open your door?

He parked at the side of the road, opened his door, and a passing car tried to tear it off!

Gogo Band rings in the new year in Crofton with high-energy show

Osborne Bay Pub favourites return to provide the party atmosphere

Robert Barron column: There are heroes among us

The five men who I saw bundled up and sped away in ambulances tried their best to save him

Family of transplant donor gives gift of popcorn at Cowichan hospital

“a really powerful part of our healing process.”

Andrea Rondeau column: The opioid, homelessness crises are on our doorstep

They had used three naloxone kits in three weeks to treat random people they’d found overdosing

VIDEO: ‘Holiday Magic’ when Celtic Rhythms and Summit Dance joined forces in Duncan

Fun and frolic combined with more serious selections to make a satisfying evening for everyone

B.C. creates $8.5M organization to improve safety for health care workers

Group will bring together unions, province, health care organizations

Kovrig clings to humour as ‘two Michaels’ near one year in Chinese prison

Their detention is widely viewed as retaliation for Canada’s arrest of Chinese high-tech scion Meng Wanzhou

B.C. VIEWS: An engine that hums right along

First Nations are leading a new surge of investment in B.C.

Brain injury from domestic abuse a ‘public health crisis,’ says B.C. researcher

Nearly 80% of the domestic violence victims who reported to police last year were women

B.C.-born hockey official talks to IIHF about switching European rule book to NHL rules

Rob Shick will represent NHL at 4th World Hockey Forum in Russia

Miller nets winner as Canucks edge Sabres 6-5 in OT

Roussel, Leivo tally two apiece for Vancouver

‘Norovirus-like’ outbreak interrupts Bantam hockey showcase in Greater Victoria

Several athletes were sent home, quarantined on the ferry

$578: that’s how much your first distracted driving ticket will cost with recent premium hikes

Over 50 per cent of Canadians admitted to using phone while driving last year, according to study

Most Read