Daniel Helmer wants to be Duncan’s next mayor. (Sarah Simpson/Citizen)

Helmer identifies drug use, homeless, as top mayoral issues

Cowichan Bay’s Daniel Helmer has done a lot of jobs in his life and he wants to add mayor of Duncan to that list.

Helmer has filed his papers with Elections BC and is campaigning to fill the role left by departing mayor Phil Kent.

Born and raised in Lethbridge, Alberta, Helmer earned his building operator certificate and worked for a variety of contractors to start his career. He then managed a resort in Tofino before opening a home repair business serving the west coast of Vancouver Island and did a multitude of other related jobs before settling in Duncan in 2004.

Helmer has worked at the Cowichan Health & Wealth Centre since 2014, spending the first two years as the building operator and then moving up to property manager.

It’s the work at that Duncan building, which he called “the hub of intravenous drug areas”, that spurred Helmer to want to run for mayor.

“It’s dealing with these intravenous drug abusers that we have to do something about,” he explained. Working together with council, the community and the RCMP on a solution to deal with these people and the dirty needles, the damages and the stealing they do. Every day I deal with a lot of these people. I see it everyday and you shouldn’t be seeing it in the city.”

Helmer said not one tent should be permitted on city property and he wants to remove the homeless population’s ability to gather.

“When they congregate that’s when they create all their crime, that’s when they create a mess and everything like that,” he said.

Helmer would also like to address Duncan’s parking problem by building a parkade downtown and work to have affordable housing “for those who are working and trying to make a better life for themselves and their families.”

“I figure if I do anything I just go right to the top,” Helmer said. “If you don’t go right to the top then what the heck, you know.”

Just Posted

Robert Barron column: Lower speed limits could save lives

That’s annoying, but at the same time, I think it will save some lives.

Andrea Rondeau column: I’ll beg if I have to, to get you to vote

Please, please, please mail in your vote in the proportional representation election.

Sarah Simpson column: Cowichan sure knows when to step up to help

Shortly after my birthday last year I wrote a column about gifts.… Continue reading

Cowichan United seeing positives despite results

U21 team falls to Lakehill, but coaches see improvement

REPLAY: B.C’s best video this week

In case you missed it, here’s a look at the replay-worth highlights from this week across the province

Death toll rises to 76 in California fire with winds ahead

Nearly 1,300 people remain unaccounted for more than a week after the fire began

Trump says report on Khashoggi death expected in a few days

Jamal Khashoggi was a columnist for The Washington Post who was slain Oct. 2 inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul

CUPW requests mediator as deadline for Canada Post offer expires without deal

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau weighed in Saturday night with a last-minute plea to the two sides

Trudeau says he won’t negotiate in public on future of LGBTQ rights in USMCA

Legislators urged Trump not to sign the agreement unless the language was removed.

Search for contaminant continues at Little Qualicum Cheeseworks

Island company ‘blown away’ by support after E. coli recall of Qualicum Spice cheese

Price makes 36 saves as Habs edge Canucks 3-2

Late goal lifts Montreal past Vancouver

BC Minister of Agriculture loses stepson to accidental overdose

Lana Popham announces death of her 23-year-old stepson, Dan Sealey

Canadian military’s template for perfect recruits outdated: Vance

Gen. Jonathan Vance, the chief of defence staff says that the military has to change because the very nature of warfare is changing, particularly when it comes to cyber-warfare

Most Read