Sensitive violinist Stefan Jackiw played Mendelssohn in Duncan with the Victoria Symphony Orchestra. (Submitted)

Review: Cowichan Symphony Society opens the season with magical concert

This was the first concert in a season of six concerts

By Mike Mills

From the moment the two French horns play in the first few bars we were transported into Carl Maria Von Weber’s Magical forest and wolf glen.

The Victoria Symphony under the masterful baton of Maestro Giordano Bellincampi was at its lyrical best in Weber’s overture to Der Freischutz as it opened the concert on Friday night.

This was the first concert in a season of six concerts brought to us by the Cowichan Symphony Society for the 2019/20 season.

Maestro Bellincampi was then joined by the young violin virtuoso from New York Stefan Jackiw. Jackiw showed complete mastery of his 1704 Rugeri violin has he took us through a beautiful performance of the ever popular Mendelssohn concerto in E Minor. Since its first performance in 1845 this innovative concerto has become one of the most popular concerti and a requisite for all aspiring violinists. Jackiw was well up to its intricacies and truly deserved the standing ovation he received at the end. Throughout, Bellincampi showed a delicate touch keeping the orchestra and the soloist in perfect balance.

After the intermission the orchestra thrilled us with a great performance Schumann’s second symphony in C Major. The work was a difficult one for Schumann as he was recovering from a nervous breakdown and some of the emotional tension comes through, especially in the first movement. Bellincampi, the music director of the Auckland symphony, brought the first movement to a crashing ending worthy of the all blacks rugby team performing their Hakka. The audience could not control their appreciation and gave a round of applause before the piece moved on to the second scherzo movement which continues the conflicting emotions.

The orchestra ably displayed why the third slow Adagio movement is considered one of Schumann’s greatest works for orchestra with the melancholy beauty of the long woodwind solos.

The fourth movement brought resolution to the conflicts and ended the way all great symphonies should in a grand finale designed to bring audiences back to the next concert; which in this case will be on Nov. 16 .

The second concert will feature works by Lars Erik Larsson, Lindberg and Mozart and the Cowichan Symphony Society looks forward to welcoming all those patrons back. But before then there is a musical luncheon extravaganza at the Chemainus Theatre on Sunday, Nov. 3. Tickets are $80 of which half is tax deductible and will feature music and drama of Shakespeare performed by talented artists, all of whom are donating their services to support the society. Tickets can be obtained by phoning 250-715-0907 or raetedrhodes@shaw.ca

Just Posted

Board declines to see new information in controversial Cowichan Bay rezoning

CVRD board now prepared for consideration of third reading and adoption

3 Cowichan salmon projects get $7,400 grants

The funds came from the Pacific Salmon Foundation’s Community Salmon Program

Crasa explodes to help Caps take three points

Cowichan falls in shootout at home, beats Kings in Powell River

Brothers in Cowichan Valley win big in lottery for 2nd time

Playimng same numbers net big wins over a three year period

Two Cowichan Tribes families devastated by duplex fire

Carla Sylvester sat in her vehicle, on Tuesday morning, with tears in… Continue reading

VIDEO: #MeToo leader launches new hashtag to mobilize U.S. voters

Tarana Burke hopes to prompt moderators to ask about sexual violence at next debate

Potent power play paces Canucks to 5-1 win over Detroit

Miller nets a pair as Vancouver wins third straight

UPDATE: British couple vacationing in Vancouver detained in U.S. after crossing border

CBP claims individuals were denied travel authorization, crossing was deliberate

After losing two baby boys, B.C. parents hope to cut through the taboo of infant death

Oct. 15 is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day in B.C.

Cheating husband sues mistress for gifted ring after wife learns about affair

The husband gave his mistress $1,000 to buy herself a ring in December 2017

B.C. massage therapist reprimanded, fined for exposing patients’ breasts

Registered massage therapist admits professional misconduct

B.C. boosts legal aid funding in new payment contract

‘Duty counsel’ service restored in some communities, David Eby says

Rugby Canada helps recovery efforts in Japan after typhoon cancels final match

Canadian players wanted to “give back in whatever small way they could”

VIDEO: Bear spies on cyclists riding by on Campbell River street

Riders seem unaware the bruin is mere feet away on the side of the road

Most Read