The Lake Cowichan Co-op grocery store was a thriving business for decades opening in Lake Cowichan about 1950. On Sept. 30

The Lake Cowichan Co-op grocery store was a thriving business for decades opening in Lake Cowichan about 1950. On Sept. 30

Some Cowichan Lake area history by the numbers

The Village of Lake Cowichan topped the charts when temperatures reached 39 degrees Celsius

A long hot summer: A heat wave hit the province in September 1988 breaking temperature records all across the province.

The Village of Lake Cowichan topped the charts when temperatures reached 39 degrees Celsius. Other communities that broke records included Williams Lake, Yale, Princeton, Merritt, Lytton and Squamish all with temps of 38 and 39 degrees.

Mount Wymper, sometimes described as “just a little north of Lake Cowichan,” at 1,541 metres elevation, is the highest mountain in Canada, below the 49th parallel.

According to the Kaatza Lakeside Players Society’s website, between December 1995 and May 2010, Lake Cowichan’s KLPSpresented 52 stage productions.

A musical, A Christmas Carol, was presented in 1985 ending with The Foursome in 2010.

The population of Caycuse, otherwise known as Camp 3, went from one 150 in 1929 to 500 in 1949.

The population began to fall in 1950 dipping to 311 by 1970 then down to just 25 in 2005.

In the 2005 Caycuse Memories book, it says that on July 23, 2005, the 50th anniversary of the opening of the road between Caycuse and Honeymoon Bay was commemorated.

The first non-native expedition into the Cowichan Lake area took place in 1857 when J. D. Pemberton, surveyor-general for Vancouver Island and his surveying party reached Cowichan Lake via the Cowichan River.

The second such expedition took place in 1864 when Robert Brown of the Vancouver Island exploring expedition reached the area.