B.C. Green Party leader Andrew Weaver and NDP Environment Minister George Heyman attend release of CleanBC climate plan, Vancouver, Dec. 5, 2018. (B.C. government)

Opposition to Trans Mountain won’t change, B.C. minister says

Pipeline projects proceed under minority Trudeau government

The election of a minority federal government under Justin Trudeau doesn’t change B.C.’s position on oil and natural gas projects, B.C. Environment Minister George Heyman says.

Commenting Tuesday on the re-election of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberals with a minority mandate, Heyman said B.C. continues its opposition to twinning the Trans Mountain oil pipeline from Alberta to the B.C. coast.

“We will be continuing to do what we’ve been doing for two years, standing up for B.C.,” Heyman said.

The B.C. NDP has supported the LNG Canada pipeline and export facility at Kitimat, extending tax incentives to help the $40 billion plan come to fruition. Heyman said he doesn’t expect federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh to attempt to stop it in a minority government, and the province’s CleanBC plan focuses on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

“I don’t see any change,” Heyman said. “Mr. Singh has said he sees a long-term future of moving away from fossil fuels. LNG Canada has been approved, it fits within CleanBC, and it currently being constructed in terms of the work camp and other plans are underway.”

RELATED: Trans Mountain notifies contractors to begin work

RELATED: LNG Canada gets tax breaks from B.C. government

The Edmonton-based Progressive Contractors Association of Canada, representing the majority of contractors on the Trans Mountain expansion project, congratulated Trudeau on his re-election.

“After a distracting and divisive campaign, it’s time for Canadians to get back to building this country’s future,” association president Paul de Jong said Tuesday. “We’re urging the Liberal government to demonstrate its commitment to ‘choosing forward’ by delivering quickly on its commitment to rebuild Canada’s aging infrastructure across all regions.”

The Trudeau government green-lighted the Trans Mountain project for a second time this past summer, and on the eve of the federal election campaign in late August, the now-federally owned Trans Mountain Corp. gave notice to its main construction contractors that it had 30 days to begin “hiring workers, procuring goods and services and developing detailed construction work plans.”

The project has faced more than a dozen legal challenges, nearly all of which were rejected by courts, and more may come forward as individual property owners along the pipeline route dispute the disturbance to their land.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Support group helps Cowichan Valley families living with dementia

No one should have to experience the dementia journey alone.

Local RCMP detachments looking to cut costs

Provincial RCMP budget facing a $10-million deficit

UPDATED: Joe gets suspended sentence in Teddy the dog cruelty case

Melissa Tooshley expected in court on Thursday in same case

Updated – Firefighters contain Chilco Road garage fire in Crofton

About 15 Crofton and Chemainus Fire Department members on the scene

Crofton author going with the flow in ‘River Tales’

Crofton author documents many interesting experiences from her time on the Cowichan River

Bye bye Bei Bei: Giant panda born in U.S. zoo heads to China

Panda heads back to China as part of cooperate breeding program

B.C. to more than double sales tax on vaping products

Tax up from 7 to 20 per cent, tobacco tax up two cents

29 B.C. students in Hong Kong amid tense protests, university siege

Eight UVic and 21 UBC students still in Hong Kong

Site where rockslide occurred along Malahat is too narrow for rock blasting or drilling: Emcon

‘Rockfalls are inevitable, so we try to increase our response times,’ says representative

‘Midget’ no more: Sweeping division name changes coming to minor hockey in Canada

Alpha-numeric division names will be used for the 2020-2021 season and beyond

Ottawa urges CN and union to continue talks as 3,200 workers go on strike

The rail workers began their strike after failing to reach a deal by a midnight deadline

Trans Mountain received $320M in government subsidies in first half 2019: report

The money included $135.8 million in direct subsidies and $183.8 million in indirect subsidies

Student tells B.C. Supreme Court she wasn’t allowed to leave indigenous smudging ceremony

Girl cross-examined Monday in Nanaimo courtroom, case continues Tuesday

Nineteen boats carrying invasive mussels stopped at B.C. borders

Waters of Columbia-Shuswap still test mussel-free

Most Read