B.C. eyes provincial truce on movie subsidies

Cost of film tax credits nearing $400m per year, Finance Minister Mike de Jong says

The 2010 movie Tron: Legacy was made in B.C.

Finance Minister Mike de Jong says B.C. is seeking a truce in the long-running subsidy war with other provinces over Hollywood movie production in a bid to contain the high cost of film tax credits.

He made the comments Wednesday at a forum on the economy and jobs at the Union of B.C. Municipalities convention, where Vancouver Coun. Adriane Carr asked what the province will do about high unemployment in the Lower Mainland film industry.

“I think we’re being played in Canada,” de Jong responded. “We’re being played one province against another. And the time has come for us to get smart and sit down as provinces and say ‘Here’s what we agree to do in Canada’.”

De Jong said B.C. has already begun exploratory talks with Ontario and Quebec on a reformed approach to film tax credits.

B.C.’s expenditure on film tax credits is nearing $400 million a year.

He said that’s paid out as a percentage of a production’s costs – no matter whether it makes or loses money – treatment other sectors can only dream about.

“I defy you to find a business in British Columbia that wouldn’t like to tally up their labour costs and send it to the government and get a cheque.”

De Jong said B.C. will continue to invest in film tax credits to support the industry, but said the province is at its limit.

“We are not either able or inclined to send more British Columbia tax dollars to a production house in Hollywood,” he said, to applause from delegates.

Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training Minister Shirley Bond said production numbers in B.C. are up this year, including major shoots involving actor George Clooney.

She said the government is considering opening a film office in Los Angeles to help sell the advantages of shooting in B.C.

 

Just Posted

Duncan City Square gala launching 39 Days of July on Friday

The 39 Days schedule/program will be hot off the presses

Editorial: Forecast for watershed too critical not to do something

The Cowichan Water Use Plan was unveiled at a meeting in Lake Cowichan on June 11

Best of the T-Birds honoured at awards night

Oliver Castle and Emma Dewit named Athletes of the Year

CLBC hosts unique Ladies 2 Bowl 6 Pack

Winning team hails from Juan de Fuca

Protesters gather as date set for dog abuse trial

Roughly 15 animal rights supporters gathered at the Duncan Law Courts Tuesday… Continue reading

Protesters gather as date set for dog abuse trial

Roughly 15 animal rights supporters gathered at the Duncan Law Courts Tuesday… Continue reading

Humboldt survivors to attend NHL Awards

Players say it’s a blessing to be back together again

Justice minister: marijuana still illegal for now

Driving under the influence of drugs has always been — and will remain — against the law

Crown recommends 150-years for Quebec mosque shooter

Crown lawyers say Alexandre Bissonnette deserves to receive the longest sentence in Canadian history

192 missing after ferry sinks in Indonesia

Drivers are searching a Indonesian lake after a ferry sank earlier this week

No clear plan yet on how to reunite parents with children

A lawyer has documented more than 300 cases of adults who have been separated from a child

Port of Prince Rupert names Shaun Stevenson as new CEO

Stevenson has worked for the port for 21 years as vice president of trade development

Senate officially passes Canada’s marijuana legalization bill

Bill C-45 now moves to royal assent, which is the final step in the legislative process

Fake attempted abduction not funny to B.C. neighbourhood residents

Two teenage boys won’t face criminal charges after scaring girl

Most Read