Johnson a worthy competitor

Although Cowichan Lake ambassador Jackie Johnson did not succeed in earning one of three BC Ambassador spots, she did prove herself a worthy competitor.

Local ambassador Jackie Johnson takes people on a tour of Cowichan Lake in the Appollos bus

Although Cowichan Lake ambassador Jackie Johnson did not succeed in earning one of three BC Ambassador spots, she did prove herself a worthy competitor.

During the competition, the weekend of Saturday, August 13,  Johnson placed in the top five in every category, against 13 competitors from across the province.

“It was a great experience,” she said last week. “My public speaking has improved so much.”

Having previously served as Cowichan Lake’s Lady of the Lake from 2007-2008, Johnson said that the BC Ambassadorship program is at a whole other level.

“I was up in front of my province, not just my community,” she said. “Even though I didn’t place, I feel that I did well.”

The competition was made up of four parts; a BC knowledge test, a formal speech, a community speech, and a talent.

The BC knowledge test took about three hours. During her studying, Johnson had to memorize more facts about the province she lives in than most people have knowledge of.

For her formal speech, Johnson spoke to how proud she is to be Canadian, fleshing out lines from the Canadian National Anthem with her interpretations.

“It’s powerful and beautiful,” she said, of the anthem. “It represents this country, and what we care and do for our country, and what its people mean.”

During her community speech, Johnson dressed up in the Appollos bus.

“I took them on a tour of our community,” she said.

During her speech, she provided a brief tidbit on each of the Cowichan Lake area communities.

Her talent consisted of a skit, highlighting her inability to successfully do stereotypical pageant talents.

She can’t dance, sing, play an instrument, but “as the skit goes on, it was about helping those in need through fund-raising,” she said.

In the end, Johnson left the competition without a title, but with $2,500 toward her post-secondary education.

She received $1,000 for her community presentation, $500 for the People’s Choice Award, and $1,000 for placing in the top five fund-raisers (Johnson raised about $3,000).

The People’s Choice Award was determined by people’s votes on the internet.

“I would like to thank everyone for their support, and for clicking and voting for me,” she said.

Johnson will return to university next month to continue her efforts toward her goal of becoming a dentist.